Endeavour OS | Review from an openSUSE User

Endeavour OS is the unofficial successor to Antegros, I’ve never used Antegros so I cannot make any comparisons between the two. It should also be noted that I think Arch Linux, in general, is more work than it is worth so this won’t exactly be a shining review. Feel free to bail here if you don’t like the direction of my initial prejudice.

I am reviewing Endeavour OS as a rather biased openSUSE Linux user that is firmly entrenched in all things openSUSE. I am going at this from the perspective that my computer is my companion, my coworker or assistant in getting my digital work done and some entertainment sprinkled in there as well.

Bottom Line Up Front: If you want to run main-line Arch, Endeavour OS is absolutely the way to get going with it. They take the “Easy Plus One” approach to Arch by allowing you to install what I would consider a minimal but very usable base and learn to use “genuine Arch” with all the triumphs and pitfalls. If you want to go Arch, I can most certainly endorse this as the route to do so. However, even after playing here for two weeks, I find Arch to be more trouble than it is worth but a great educational experience.

Installation

Installing Arch using the “Arch Method” from the Wiki is pretty obtuse. Following it, step by step is not clear and leaves to many aspects ambiguous and unclear. It should NOT be a “beginners guide” at all. Thankfully, Endeavour OS installer bypasses the nonsense so you can get going with Arch.

The media will boot quickly and you are given a shiny desktop with a window open. There are two tabs, the first tab has two selections: one access to offline information and the second for information the Endeavour OS website. The second tab will allow you to create partitions and to install Endeavour OS to the disk.

Should you choose to make modifications to the existing file system. You can do so from here using the Gparted tool.

Since I set this up to be on a virtual machine, I intended on using the entire disk so no partitioning was necessary. Selecting Install EndeavourOS to disk initiates the installer. It will start out requesting language then Location.

Next is the Keyboard layout and your partitions preference. Since this is a simple setup, I selected to erase the disk to meet my testing requirements.

Lastly, the User, computer hostname and passwords will be entered. The last step being the summary and a final sanity check. Not a single step was difficult in this process. It was all very straight forward.

The installation proceeds rather quickly and gives some rather enjoyable propaganda is presented. One questioning your disposition towards the terminal.

Once the installation is complete, I restarted the system to boot into the newly installed Arch Linux based operating system.

First run and Impressions

Something that is most noteworthy was the speed at which Endeavour OS went from boot screen to login prompt. It wasn’t just fast, it was as expeditious as the time it takes to flip the switch of a Commodore 64 having that momentary pause and be greeted with that comforting blue glow on a 1084S CRT.

Upon logging in, you are presented one of the finest looking Xfce desktops I have ever seen. The only issue I had with the start up is that this Kalu applet spews out important system “news”. It was a little like going to a relatives house and being greeted by that over excited nephew

The first thing I thought I would do would be to perform some updates. After all, I had just been informed, quite clearly that there are lots of updates pending. After punching in my root password, the installer commenced with such an incredible display of detail that it tickled every nerdy nerve ending.

After the updates completed there was not a single issue with the system. It all booted with the latest and greatest Arch has to offer and just as stable as before. That meant it was time to check out the customization options. Make some tweaks to remove that piercing white from the User Interface.

After clicking through a few themes, the appearance that sat the best with me was the Arc-Dark theme. Adwaita-dark was a close second and would make me just about as happy.

The default file manager is satisfactory. It’s not quite as good as Dolphin but for basic use, it will work well. The icon theme looks real nice and makes for a real pleasant and complete experience.

When it came time to install software, it was time to see what Endeavour had installed for me to accomplish that task. The good news is, they gave you everything you need… the terminal and the Pacman package manager.

Since I am mostly aware of how to use Pacman, this isn’t a big deal but the Endeavour OS Pacman basic commands list page is lacking the search function but I do have that solution in hand. Since I am not a complete dolt, I am able to figure these things out but as I learn the Pacman commands, I find them to be an adhoc mess. After sifting through the Arch Wiki the search command is performed like this:

pacman -Ss <package name>

Once you determine the package you want to install, it can be done as such.

sudo pacman -S <package name>

…Because it is completely intuitive to have -S be install and -Ss be search… I’m sure it makes sense to someone, somewhere.

I was able to search for and install many of the applications I would need except one. Surprisingly, I was not able to install osc the Open Build Service Commander command line tool. I find it odd that it is in the Debian repositories but not Arch which seemingly has everything.

I is probably available in the Arch User Repository (AUR) of which is something I would avoid as it is kind of the wild, wild west of software. Some say they love it, others tell me to avoid it and some tell me I have to read through everything carefully to make sure I am not installing anything dangerous. All of which makes me sigh.

What I Like

The installer is easy to use. It is quick to get going with Arch and not have to muddle around with the nearly useless “Basic Installation Guide” provided on the Arch Wiki. The basic installation with Endavour OS gives you a fine looking Xfce Desktop Environment and tweaks it well enough that one can comfortably get going with it and accomplish basic tasks… that is… after you’ve installed your desired applications

The boot up time for Endeavour OS is fast, not just fast, but strap in, hang on, we are jumping to warp speed kind of fast. Granted, I haven’t set up the loads on this that I do on my regular machine so I can’t say if it would fare any differently but out of the gate, Endeavour will not leave you impatiently tapping your foot at any point.

Most importantly, and this is quite subjective, but the community is quite friendly. When it is all said and done. Linux is not just an operating system of components but one of people and community members. Just in observation alone, the project seems to foster a sense of community that is extremely helpful and quite engaged. That feature alone makes Endeavour OS worth all the hassle of using Arch tools.

What I Don’t Like

Pacman has a real obtuse syntax. I don’t care what the justification might be but understanding how to install software on an Arch distribution should not be as such. This is ridiculously unintuitive and doesn’t feel like it was well planned out at all. It absolutely feels like they added features and chose a letter in the same way you would pick one playing Scrabble.

Since this is Arch based, there are some rather dubious quality assurance practices. There isn’t that automated testing as you would see in openSUSE, openQA to minimize the likelihood of new software breaking systems. In my opinion… let me underscore, bold and italicize opinion, this would not make for a good server or production machine environment. Many people will say they run it just fine. I would submit that these individuals are intimately acquainted with their systems and know it inside and out. There is merit and utility in this but I don’t have the time for another relationship with a computer (insert Commodore Amiga jokes here).

Not as big of a deal but there isn’t a good description of how to get software for Endeavour OS on your system. There isn’t a graphic installer or instructions on the Endeavour OS website for searching for packages. You kind of have to fend for yourself. This is, adamantly a minor issue and easily rectified.

As wonderful as the AUR is and how likely it is that the software has no malware, it is still the wild, wild west of software. There is no guarantee that the software will be maintained or tested against the current versions in the official repository. There is no guarantee on proper testing or any level of quality assurance either.

Final Thoughts

If you are going to jump with both feet into the murky, shark infested waters of Arch, Endeavour OS provides a great life raft, or maybe an actual dingy to shield you from some of the hazards of using Arch. I wouldn’t put any stock into it holding up long term but that is quite likely my experiential bias of using Arch and perhaps my lack of fully understanding how to use the Arch tools… but that brings me to my next point. I am not a Linux noobie. Using and managing numerous Linux machines on numerous devices has been mostly effortless and automatic. Arch is like taking numerous steps backward. The machine doesn’t work for you, you work for the machine. Although I didn’t have any issues with Arch in the two weeks I used it, I have had previous installs go wonky on me. I do admit, it may be due to my lack of understanding and experience on Arch.

The Endeavour team has made huge strides in getting Arch Linux closer to what I would consider sustainable but it is still too much like flying a helicopter with a wonky tail rotor through a derecho on half a tank of fuel. It’s only a matter of time before something goes wrong. I see the utility in Arch but not the benefits, at least, not any benefits that outweigh what openSUSE gives me.

References

Endeavour OS Download

Endeavour OS Pacman basic commands list

10 thoughts on “Endeavour OS | Review from an openSUSE User

  1. Tumbleweed is my second favorite distro after EndeavourOS. I am a rolling person. My biggest gripes with Suse is the stupid workaround for multimedia. Hopefully that will change soon. And of course having to bloat my system with flatpak installs due to no AUR.
    I am always tempted to install it when reinstalling.
    Anyway, thank you for an honest and fair review. I never have trouble with the stability of Arch but I have a 5 year old machine with very common hardware. No surprises for the OS…

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    1. I can understand your frustrations with the multimedia in openSUSE. Due to legal reasons, they cannot include all the codecs. Thankfully it’s really quite straight forward to add the third party repositories, so it’s not really a work around as much as it is an amendment.

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  2. I hopped through Tumbleweed before finally stopping on Antergos (which is Endeavour’s precursor) which is Arch. The reason I hopped was the lack of packages on Tumbleweed. Arch + AUR goves you the largest software database. Most Arch users trust AUR, or take a quick glance at the pkg files to make sure the package i built against the official git repository of the actual software they want to install. I usually just skip this check. So, from your article i see the biggest gripe is with the software. First thing i do on an Arch system is to install a GUI package manager and enable AUR on them. Pamac or octopi are two of the best GUI software managers. From there, everything looks just like your regular user friendly linux distro.

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    1. I appreciate your feedback! My answer on what distribution of Linux one should use will always be, use what works best for you. I see the utility in Arch but the amount of effort it takes to use it as a regular system is not compatible with me. The AUR is the “wild wild west” of software sources and there isn’t any meaningful QA performed. Neither Pamac nor Octopi are available in the official Arch repositories so if I run my Arch system in the manner prescribed by the Arch purists, I am putting my system at risk. There is also no guarantee that by using software from the AUR that the community will continue to support updates to that software so it may, without warning, just stop working. I will give you that such a concern is a risk in any rolling distro but I do have the convenience of Zypper in openSUSE that will not only warn me but give me options as to how to proceed with “broken” software. I also have the assurance that any software I am able to install has some level of QA performed upon it.

      I want to underscore the idea that you SHOULD use what YOU enjoy most; what fits your particular ethos. I am personally not willing to invest the time in using a rolling distribution without the safety nets provided by openSUSE Tumbleweed. For the most part, I can get my software from the build service, if not, there are AppImages, Flatpak and Snaps to fill in the gaps. In my own admittedly biased view, I don’t see a whole lot of AUR benefits.

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  3. I am using endeavour now, it’s running fine. I have a usb wifi router of Tp link, model, TL wn823n. I want to ask you, if I moved to tumbleweed, would I get the support for it? In arch, a realtech driver have to install from AUR to get the wifi service. Problem is, each time the kernel updated, the wifi driver stopped working in arch. What’s in openSuse? Please tell me about the support. I have never used openSuse and wish to move to tumbleweed.

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    1. My understanding is that it has been included in the kernal on openSUSE since 4.11 but I cannot test any hardware to verify. My experience with openSUSE and Wifi has been pretty fantastic. I use Plasma and the NetworkManager tool is tip-top.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Hey, really appreciate your review. you start by mentioning where your allegiances like and are fair of your assessment of the product. Great job thanks!

    Like

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