Ceiling Fan Failure | Repair Instead of Replace

ICanFixIt

Not long ago, I had a ceiling fan stop spinning and start making an ever so slight buzzing noise. I thought maybe it was as a result of switching the rotation direction of the fan. Switching it back didn’t change anything either. I just shut off the fan motor to end the buzzing and pondered about how much I dread changing ceiling fans especially since the fan in the living room match this failed dining room fan. I really wanted to repair this Hampton Bay Ceiling fan rather than replace it.

Ceiling Fan Not Spinning-02

After doing a little Internet research, searching “repair ceiling fan”, I got a lot of cruft and useless information. Next I tried to narrow it down to “ceiling fan not spinning” and “replace ceiling fan motor” to only find more non-solutions. Then I stumbled upon this site that identified the capacitor as a possible cause of failure.

Then I did nothing about it until I was gifted a broken fan.

Donor Fan

I had no idea if this donor fan had a compatible capacitor not but it was worth a try. I started out by pulling apart the ceiling fan.

Ceiling Fan Dismantle.jpg

I removed the bulbs, shades then the three screws that hold the light kit in place. Upon removing the capacitor and it was very obvious that the capacitor had failed as it had very prominent bulging on two sides of it.

Bulging Capacitor.jpg

I took note that this is a 280V 4.5µF x 6µF x 5µF capacitor and decided to do some searching on the web for prices, because, I wasn’t sure how much such a thing would cost. I’m sure you can imagine my happy surprise when I discovered that the donor fan had the exact same capacitor my ceiling fan.

Donor Fan Capacitor

This was enough for me to commit fully the project. I removed the old capacitor, marked the switch side gray wire striped the wire ends to ready it for the donor capacitor. The rest of the wires were in the exact same configuration as the original so wiring this in was trivial.

Removing Dead Capacitor.jpg

I used 16-14 AWG Vinyl Insulated Butt Splice and prepared the capacitor to be installed in the ceiling fan. I tagged the gray leg that went to the switch on the donor and checked to see it was the same leg on the crippled unit.

Donor Capacitor Prepared.jpg

I realized that I wasn’t sure if the motor was damaged or not by the failed capacitor but there was no appreciable risk in trying. After crimping the capacitor into the fan, I flipped the switch and pulled the chain to have the desired result of spinning blades.

Ceiling Fan Spinning-01.jpg

I stopped, looked at my success and had a moment of smiling from ear to ear. As much as I liked this look of the light kit hanging down from the fan. I didn’t have any interest in bumping my head into it.

Ceiling Fan Spinning-02

Since the shades were off, I took this as an opportunity to hand wash the light shades, dust the blades and body to shine the thing up before completing its reassembly.

Final Thoughts

I get a lot of satisfaction out of fixing things. I call this project a great success. No money out of pocket and only just over an hour of time invested. How much money did I save? A 52-Inch, 5-blade fan of similar design is about $80 but to have matching fans, I would have had to buy two fans and spend the time removing and installing the new fans. Now, I get to keep my 6 year old fans going just a bit longer and I saved quite a bit of time too. Now, I just have to dispose of the remains of the donor fan in an ecologically sound manner.

Further Reading

Ceiling Fan Capacitors

Replace a Ceiling Fan Motor

Ceiling Fan Capacitor on Amazon

16-14 AWG Vinyl Insulated Butt Splice

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Dell Latitude 15 3000, Laptop Screen Replacement

ICanFixIt

Recently, a coworker asked if I could repair their brand new laptop. I get a bit uncomfortable with repairing other people’s things because I worry that I am going to make things worse. All too often when I repair something for myself, it turns into a mess and takes longer to fix and more money than originally estimated. I help my coworker searched Ebay for a suitable replacement. She said she would order the part so long as I would fix it.

I agreed.

Fast forward a week and she, had the screen and asked me if I could install the new screen. In my lack of preparedness, I didn’t read up or search YouTube ahead of time on how to fix it. Luckily, I found this video which was very short and I could skip through to understand the steps.

This laptop is quite possibly the easiest screen repair I have ever done. The bezel removes just by puling it away.

Inspiron 15 3000-02.jpg

This will reveal the four screws needed to unfasten the screen from the lid. I placed the screen against the keyboard and disconnected the the tiny LVDS cable from the panel.

Inspiron 15 3000-04.jpgTo install, reverse the steps… 4 screws, not hard.

After turning it on, I found that I didn’t connect the cable firmly enough. It started out just fine but as it started to boot up, there appeared a vertical line then just this blank gray screen (yeah, not hard).

Inspiron 15 3000-06.jpg

Initially, I had that cold sweat where I was afraid I did something terribly wrong. Without panicking, I took the screen back apart and re-seated the connector, ensuring that it was firmly in place. This time tested that it was indeed functioning before installing the bezel.

Mission accomplished

Inspiron 15 3000-05.png

Lessons Learned

Be prepared before staring a fix-it project, especially for someone else. Have the proper tools and do the research ahead of time. Sure, this on-the-fly fix turned out fine but I have had laptop screen replacements be a giant pain and this could very well have become one. Also, pay close attention to the connector and ensure that it is seated properly and route any cables in the proper pathways in the screen assembly. That will make reassembly much easier

Final Thoughts

This computer is fairly nicely equipped for a basic machine. It has 4 GiB of RAM which is plenty for most users. I did observe that this thing is dreadfully slow in just about every measurable sense. Although brand new, it ran horribly slow. I know that Dell doesn’t just pump out garbage so my guess is it that this is a Windows problem. I will try to convince this coworker they need openSUSE installed. I am quite certain it would run much better.

Reference Links

Dell Inspiron 15 3000 Screen Repair video on YouTube

Dell Latitude 15 3000

Porter-Cable 18v Drill Repair | Forward/Reverse Button

Porter-Cable Drill-02-Disassembled.jpg

I bought into the 18v Porter-Cable cordless tool system in 2009 with the 4-tool Combination kit. It came with a drill, reciprocating saw, circular saw and a rather nice flashlight. I got these tools to conduct some renovations on rental property and they all worked very well. At that time, I was a HUGE Porter-Cable fan as they enabled me to add to this system more very useful 18v tools. As more tools were being released, more were going to be available for this system and I had a project for every one.

Many Happy [Porter-Cable] Years Later

When renovating house in 2014, I broke the Forward/Reverse Button while drilling a 4 inch hole for the purpose of routing a vent for a bathroom. In my late-night cramming to complete the project, I was obviously not at my peek, exhausted and not ensuring my drill remained coaxial to the hole I was drilling. While cutting the hole, the drill jerked, my thumb hit the Forward/Reverse Button, something snapped and the button moved back and forth freely with a limp rattle. I planned to fix it after my family vacation but it ended up just sitting… for a long time.

I brought the drill to work with the intent of taking advantage of the tools in the model shop to conduct the repair. Like so many other good intentions, they start well and just end up sitting, and it did until a coworker made a comment. “Hey Porter-Cable! I love Porter-Cable! Why is it sitting there?”

I had some time at that moment, waiting on feedback from an engineer to some design of a some part or system so I decided to investigate the true failure of the drill as I explain how the drill ended up at my desk.

Porter-Cable Drill-03-DisassembledThe drill was held together with 8, easily accessible, screws but there was some significant resistance at separating the two halves of the drill. After applying what I would consider an unreasonable amount of force, the drill exploded in my hands.

Porter-Cable Drill-01-Broken pin.jpg

There really isn’t much to a drill. It is basically a handle with a trigger designed around a motor and gear box.

Upon examining the Forward/Reverse Button, it was very apparent what exactly had failed: a very small pin that protruded from the component simply sheered off. It was no longer able to move the selector mechanism at the bottom of the motor assembly. I wasn’t sure what the best solution was for fixing the switch so I took the part and its broken bit to the model shop to consult one of the many individuals, all of which are more adept and providing an effective solution.

Porter-Cable Drill-05-Fixed selector switch.jpg

The model maker I took it to, looked at the parts and said that the first course of action he would try would be to use an industrial strength version of Loctite with an accelerator. The two parts allowed me to layer and harden some more of the glue around the base for added strength. I was a bit skeptical but the model maker assured me that the rapid-prototypes that are made in sections are held together quite successfully with this adhesive. Worst case, it doesn’t hold up and I try something else so there was nothing to lose.

Reassembly

While reassembling the drill, I discovered what was causing the resistance to disassembly. A little RF theft prevention tag stuck on the inside of the base of the drill.

Porter-Cable Drill-04-RF ID Tag

I am fascinated by the placement of the RF theft prevention tag. I would like to see how they actually stuck that in that location on the assembly line. I imagine it was placed after the halves of the drill were fascinated together… but how?

The only real challenge to assembly of this drill was this black wire that seemed to be oddly short, compared to the other wires. It required some extra persuasion to get the wire in a place that would not pinch it when fastening the halves together. I couldn’t see how the wire was routed from the factory as the drill sort of spilled into pieces when I was forcing it apart.

Porter-Cable Drill-06-Reassembly.jpg

Assembled and Put To Work

I employed the drill this weekend and it works fantastically, once again. I am glad to have two functioning drills again among the rest of my 18v cordless, Porter-Cable tools. Even though this isn’t powered by one of those new, fancy brushless motors, it has the torque to do the job, every time.

Porter-Cable Drill-07-complete.jpg

Final Thoughts

Unfortunately, after purchasing every 18v Porter-Cable tool, they decided to abandon the 18v platform in favor of this new 20v MAX platform. It annoys me because “20v” is technically 18v so there is no additional power gained. My 18v tools are now an abandoned platform which is quite irritating after investing all that I did in the platform. My batteries are fading and I am not prepared to replace all these tools as that would be a poor economic decision. I also do not want two different battery systems. It is unfortunate that there isn’t an upgrade path to the 20v MAX line from the 18v tools, such as battery adapters or something to encourage me to start buying the newer line of tools. So now, I am at a decision point. I either need to buy some new or refurbished batteries or possibly replace the cells in my battery packs. I have projects that do require some new tools but do I go with Porter-Cable or do I abandon the brand just as they abandoned me with the 18v line?

What’s the Linux connection? There isn’t. This is just tech I use to get other, non Linux-y, things done.

References

Porter-Cable

Pro Tool Reviews 20v vs 18v

3D Printed 20v Battery to 18v Porter-Cable Tool Adapter

Wii Console Repair and Homebrew Hack

Wii_console_Hack.png

The Nintendo Wii, in my belief, was the best video game console ever created. It was a very popular family-unifying gaming counsel. Instead of the typical behavior of the gaming system monopolizing a single person’s time, this brought family together much like you would have on family game night. A vehicle of interaction. The Wii moved game night from from the dining room table into the living room.

I have had a Wii since… I think 2009 or 2010 and at some point in time the Optical Drive stopped reading discs. The machine was relegated to streaming Netflix and Amazon Prime videos only, but that changed recently as I wanted to crack open those dusty Wii game cases once again.

After doing some research I found that there are two types of drives that can be used in the Wii; One that is Wii discs only and the other that does Wii and GameCube discs. The latter being more expensive but regardless, I purchased a drive that was GameCube compatible of approximately $20 on eBay.

I have yet to play a GameCube game on the Wii but I plan to give one a spin, eventually.

If you would like to repair your Wii, see this video, it worked very well for me. Lots of little steps but nothing complex. To put it back together, just reverse the steps. My advice on taking it apart is to take a piece of tape, place it sticky side up and use that as a kind of timeline for screws you remove so when you go in reverse you don’t grab the wrong screw.

The only real issues I had with the disassembly / assembly process were screws in precarious places.

DSC06582.JPG

And ensuring that the rubber grommet for the DVD drive was properly assembled onto the chassis. Rubber has a way of doing what it wants which isn’t always what you want.

Wii Repair-03.jpg

Once the machine was back together, it was working just as expected but since Nintendo has abandoned this piece of hardware, it was time to make some improvements to it.

Expanding the Capabilities

Since I do like the Wii very much, it makes me a bit sad about it’s state of abandonment but that is the way of things. I set out to expand the capabilities beyond what Nintendo envisioned so that I can do more with this machine. Very clever people have made it easy to add homebrew software to the Wii through what is call the Homebrew Channel.

The first step was to do a non-hardware modification. Using LetterBomb to enable the Homebrew requires only an SD Card and some way of transferring data to it. In my case, a Linux Laptop. Once you extract the contents and put it on the SD Card as outlined here, put it back in the Wii. There you will have a new message in the Message system on the Wii. Upon opening the LetterBomb in Messages, the system will drop down to a console and run a script that will add the Homebrew capabilities. It’s pretty simple and it sets the system up without any further user intervention.

Wii Media Center

There is no point in having the Homebrew Channel without homebrew software. My first task was to add the capability to Watch DVDs. A feature that Nintendo, irritatingly, decided not to include. To install the Wii Media Center follow this link:

http://www.wiimc.org/documentation/

I chose the New install of the WiiMC and simultaneously installed the WiiMC Channel 2.0. I downloaded the files to my Wii project folder on my computer and extracted the Zips.

Since I am using KDE Plasma, I extracted the zips as such using the Dolphin File Manager:

  • Right-click > Extract > Extract Archive Here, Autodetect Subfolder
  • That created a folder called apps and two subfolders: wiimc and wiimc-channel-installer
  • Copy the extracted folders into the apps folder on the SD Card used for the Wii.

On the Wii, Open the Homebrew Channel run the applications you just copied over. Just that simple.

WiiMC Start Pic

Now, I am able to play DVDs, seemingly without any issues. I have played a few DVDs, yes, I still buy DVDs. So far, I have only noticed one DVD with an issue. When I popped in “Star Wars: The Last Jedi”, I did get some herky-jerky playback, I am assuming due to the encryption used on the disc.

I can now play media files directly from a USB Drive or SD Card but it has proven itself to be a bit touch-and-go. Some files played very well and others not so well. I will have to investigate further about which files played better than others. At this point, I don’t know if it is the file format or the resolution of the video.

Next Steps

I intend on expanding my Wii’s capabilities into more of a retro gaming console. I have purchased a few games from the Wii Store back in the day but as of today, the selection has become very limited they have already stopped accepting payment for more credits on the Wii Shop Channel. The only solution I see is fit, going forward, is using the Homebrew Application method of adding emulators and games. I have been told that the Wii makes a great retro gaming station and I plan to follow up on that portion of my exploration of the Wii Homebrew Applications.

Final Thoughts

Looking at the dates of many of the Homebrew software titles, it looks like much of it is not being maintained or at least hasn’t been updated in several years. My guess is that the Wii is falling out of popularity, even for the homebrew scene. It is unfortunate because I believe to still be a very capable entertainment platform. I do hope that Netflix continues to support the Wii as a platform for streaming as I know Amazon Prime is planning to discontinue their service sometime in 2018. Very soon all that will be left to use on the Wii will be the original optical media titles and the large array of Homebrew software. As it goes with technology, this too has been superseded by the new and shiny so this fine piece of hardware is slowly being abandoned.

External References

Disassemble Wii YouTube Video

LetterBomb Homebrew Exploit

WiiMC Documentation

HP TouchPad in 2018

HP_TouchPad_Title.png

I purchased two HP TouchPads a few years ago when they were fairly inexpensive. I wanted a larger tablet that wasn’t built cheaply. They worked great for a while but started to act up. I used them less and less until they just stopped working all together. I put them on a shelf and forgot about the for quite a while.

A buddy of mine who is still seemingly a huge fan of the HP TouchPad diagnosed that one had a main board and battery failure while the other just a battery failure. I put them back on the shelf and that is where they sat, once again. He followed up with me wondering if I bought a battery yet (keeping me accountable) to which I did not. He told me he had an extra battery and dropped it off along with the needed tools to disassemble and make the repair.

HP_TouchPad-01The guide I looked at made it seem like it would be easy to take the tablet apart, just work your way along the sides, as described and carefully separate the two halves. What seemed to be missing from the article was that you have to shim the screen from the backing to keep it from clipping itself back shut again.

Once the tablet was apart, I disconnected the halves and started the process of removing more pieces until I could get the battery out. I only ended up taking out 3 of the internal components.

Upon removing the HP_TouchPad-02.jpgUSB board, I noticed that one of the wires for the little vibrator motor had somehow broken free from the board. A fine explanation for why this unit didn’t have haptic feedback. Thankfully, my soldiering skills were adequate enough to correct the issue.

HP_TouchPad-04

There were only 4 screws retained the battery and it should be noted that once the screws have been removed, the battery will not come out easily as it is also adhered to the device. Very careful and slow removal of the battery was warranted as I learned my lesson about removing a lithium polymer battery years ago on another project. I didn’t want to rupture the sells and have a little fire or at least lots of heat and smoke.

Once I freed the battery from the case, I noticed that I could take a shortcut and remove the battery without disassembling all of the components as outlined in the guide. I freed the battery from it’s compartment, set it aside, took the new battery and using a flat tipped screwdriver, was able to insert the connector of the new battery into the board and fasten it to the tablet body.  I effectively skipped the last 15 steps of the guide I used and reassembled it.

Success… but it didn’t turn on.

I figured that the thing needed to be charged so I let it charge overnight. It still didn’t turn on and I felt obligated to let my buddy know that this TouchPad is dead and asked if he wanted the battery back. Then, he asked if I did the hard reboot, hold power and volume down for 30 seconds.

HP_TouchPad-06-Boot Loader.jpg

I did just that and immediately it went to the ClockworkMod boot loader menu. I selected the CyanogenMod image already installed on this TouchPad and I was very pleased to see that it was fully functional.

Since I wasn’t going to leave this with a 2 year old version of Android on it, I began my search for an updated ROM. There are several options out there and some of the newer versions of Android seem to have Bluetooth or camera issues. I didn’t want to have any hardware issues so I ended up going with this version here. Everything works but it is an older version of Android with security patch updates.

Another requirement I made is that I wanted to ensure that there were no Google Services on this tablet as I didn’t want to weigh it down with all the data scraping and mining services. All I want from this tablet is to do causal web browsing, reading ebook and PDF documents so there is no need to install the Gapps package. I also wanted to see how useful a simple de-Googled tablet would be.

F-Droid-siteSince I did want to have access to applications on this device, I installed F-Droid. F-Droid is similar to the Play Store, an available catalog of FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) Android applications. Most of the applications I want to run are available there and anything else it is possible for me to sideload or install using Yalp.

The applications I installed:

  • KDE Connect
  • Telegram
  • Syncthing
  • Fennec F-Droid, a Mozilla based web browser
  • Barcode Scanner
  • Book Reader
  • Yalp, allows you to download apps directly from Google Play Store as apk files.

Installed Using Yalp:

  • Discord
  • ASTRO File Manager

HP_TouchPad-05-apps

Modifications to improve my usage experience

I turned off the KDE Connect Telegram Notification. Not because I don’t like Telegram but because I don’t want multiple notifications on my Desktop Linux machine for the same message.

To do so, withing the KDE Connect Application on the paired device Menu > Plugin settings > Notification sync configure button, scrolled down to Telegram and uncheck it.

HP_TouchPad-07

Next, I made the KDE Connect Keyboard an input option by going into System Settings > Language & Input and checked KDE Connect Remote Keyboard

HP_TouchPad-08-Input

I set up a folder on the Tablet called Sync and using Syncthing have it tied to two of my openSUSE desktop Linux machines. It is an easy and efficient drag and drop method of putting files on the tablet instead of using KDE Connect. I figure, more options are better than fewer options for sharing data.

HP_TouchPad-10-syncthing.png

Using Dolphin in KDE Plasma to drag and drop files right on the HP TouchPad file system is such a fantastic feature. This, combined with having a folder that I can use to sync between all my systems and a shared clipboard gives me the truly practical form of desktop/mobile convergence.

HP_TouchPad-11-file manager

What I like

HP_TouchPad-09The size of this tablet is perfect for how I intend on using it. I can check things, look up things, and use it for accessing references in either PDF, ebook or my favorite resource, the openSUSE Wiki. To copy and paste from the tablet is made super easy, thanks to KDE Conenct. Copy on the tablet, paste on the Desktop. This tablet has such a nice weight and feel about and the protective folio-style case is great. I have all the functions and features I need to do what I set out with this 2011 built tablet. Sure, it is old and well past a tablet end of life but it is fast, very snappy and responsive.

What I Don’t Like

I have an outdated version of Android but with the security patches back-ported though, I do like the dark look of the older Android UI, so lets call this point a wash. The downside is, it doesn’t allow for certain newer KDE Connect features as noted here by one of the developers.

I also may have done something to disconnect the internal speakers as I don’t hear sound unless I plug into the headphone jack or Bluetooth speaker. I am not really using this for multimedia and the workaround is satisfactory.

I am not a fan of the rear facing only camera on the tablet. It also distorts the image during the “live view” but the picture itself has the proper aspect ratio. Unless if I want too take some awkward selfies, I don’t see this as a terrible issue.

Final Thoughts

I am very glad to have a working HP TouchPad once again. Is it indeed limited but I am not using it like a brand new tablet, I am using it closer to how a tablet was used 7 years ago. I am also not using this tablet like I would a proper computer as that would require a keyboard and mouse and once I have added those items, I may as well use a laptop. This fantastic little device does just what I want it to do, superbly.

Using KDE Connect and Syncthing, I can have the proper mobile/desktop convergence with my openSUSE Linux desktops in a highly practical manner anywhere I go, without the need for a third party service.

I am not sure what I will do with the other tablet now. This one is just so great, I might have to get the other one working just to keep in my cubicle. Would I recommend this tablet to someone else? For most people, probably not, unless they like to noodle around with technology.  Was it worth taking the time to fix it? Also, probably not but the satisfaction for me out of making this older yet perfectly usable hardware functional once again makes it more than worth the time and effort.

Further Reading, useful links and such

I Fix It Guide for the HP TouchPad

Tenderloin Android ROM I have installed on my HP Touchpad

openSUSE Wiki

KDE Connect Developer Nico’s Blog Post

KDE Connect Community Site

Casio Synthesizer Rescue Repair

Casio_Keyboard-Transparent.pngWhen I’m not playing with Linux things, I am often noodling around with other machines, appliances or electronics. I have developed this delight in fixing things which has turned into this sense of, “I can fix it” attitude toward just about anything.

I only wish I had a magic hammer…

Recently, a neighbor was telling me that within a few hours of her eldest son unwrapping a birthday gift of a long sought after musical instrument, some horseplay rendered it inoperable. I told her, “I can [probably] fix it.” Grabbed my little electronics tool box and moseyed my way over to her house.

20180330_175105.jpgThis Synthesizer is a 61-key, Casio CTK2400. The back of this machine had only two ports, a 1/4″ (6.35mm) and a USB Type-B receptacle. No Midi or separate line out. Looking inside the jack, there were the remains of A TRS 1/4″ to 1/8″ headphone jack adapter which broke off inside of the keyboard. It broke off in such a way that the portion inside could not be easily removed. The tip of the jack was stuck inside of the socket which deactivated the internal speakers. My observation of the portion that had broken off of the adapter made very apparent that it was poorly manufactured as the ring detached itself from the sleeve. I tried a few “of course it won’t work” action to remove the tip, then decided it was time to open the keyboard up. After removing several screws to expose the main board, I discovered that the headphone socket was enclosed on the board so I could not push anything out from the inside.

socket-switch.png
Expected socket configuration.

I was expecting to see something open and exposed so I could just, knock out the bits similar to what is pictured on the inside of the keyboard but was greeted, instead, with a plastic, closed off box that looked to be sonic welded shut. The keyboard was then reassembled.

Swing and a miss…..

I put the keyboard back together to use a pair of tweezers and a screwdriver to dig out the broken bits. Nearly everything came out but just the very tip of the jack. I was at a loss of what to do next and I did some searching on the web of varying key terms and eventually found how someone else used super glue and an ice pick. I had the super glue but not the ice pick .

 

Headphone Jack tip

I took a very small slotted screwdriver, generally used for working on small electronics, put a glob of superglue on the end and pushed it carefully against the remaining jammed bit inside the keyboard and held it firmly in place. I waited for a few minutes and slowly, carefully pulled out the 1/4″ tip.

Success!

I plugged in the keyboard to make sure it worked after all the probing, digging and tugging. Sure enough, it worked just fine, I noodled around with it a bit and thought, “What a nice little synthesizer.” Regrettably, I have buried that musical talent many years ago.

I returned the keyboard, now in proper working order to its owner. It was great to see a the expression of joy come over that kid’s face as he could once again play his brand new instrument.

The Curiosity Bug Bit Me

I had to learn about this keyboard, what was that USB port for and is it something Linux friendly. I downloaded the manual on the machine where I learned that this is some form of USB MIDI interface. Doing some further search where I landed on the Arch Wiki and it had a lot of good information on it. That is, unfortunately as far as I will go with it as it is not my machine to mess with. I was very encouraged that, although not often in the Linux spotlight, there looks to be a lot of effort in this area of the arts.

Final Thoughts

Fixing electronics and appliances, even basic issues brings about quite a bit of satisfaction. Restoring happiness to a kid on his birthday is just the best. I am grateful that the internet has empowered and made it easier to fix things, you know, when you get into a bind.

Music creation on Linux is a thing and I hope to see it continue to be an area of active development. Perhaps, one day, I might be able to dust off what little musical talent I have and dovetail it into my Linux hobby.

External Links

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/USB_MIDI_keyboards

Headphone tip removal