ltunify | Tool for working with Logitech Unifying receivers and devices on openSUSE

I recently became increasingly annoyed using the Touchpad portion of this wireless keyboard. Touchpads just are not as efficient as a real mouse. The touchpad is fine for very simple navigation but for doing anything that requires much traversing around the screen combined with much left and right-mouse button clicking is almost unusable. Maybe if this keyboard had real left and right mouse buttons, this wouldn’t be so bad.

Microsoft Wireless Keyboard Touchpad.jpg

I happened to have an orphaned Logitech receiver doing nothing in one of my many drawers of horded electronics. All I needed was a mouse to pair up with it. Since this one is one of those Logitech Unifying Receivers, all I needed was a Logitech mouse that was compatible with it. I went to my favorite place to buy used electronics, eBay, to get the cheapest thing I could find. I came upon a Logitech M185 Wireless Mouse which I ended up winning for $3.00, so a great deal.

Logitech Unifying Receiver and M185 Mouse.jpg

Next, I had to pair this newly acquired mouse with my Unifying Receiver. To do so, I needed to install the Ltunify application.

Installation

Like nearly everything on openSUSE, installing software through the official, experimental or community repositories is easy to do. The easiest method is using the one-click installation from here:

https://software.opensuse.org/package/ltunify

Or if you prefer the terminal, which I happen to, you will have to add a repository then install the application.

Repository for Tumbleweed

sudo zypper ar http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/hardware/openSUSE_Tumbleweed/ Hardware

Repository for Leap 15.0

sudo zypper ar http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/hardware/openSUSE_Leap_15.0/ Hardware

Refresh all repositories

sudo zypper ref

Install the application

sudo zypper in ltunify

Application Usage

Once the application is installed, I just typed ltunify -h in the terminal to see the help and gain some understanding on how to use this.

# ltunify -h
Usage: ltunify [options] cmd [cmd options]
Logitech Unifying tool version
Copyright (C) 2013 Peter Wu <lekensteyn@gmail.com>

Generic options:
-d, –device path Bypass detection, specify custom hidraw device.
-D Print debugging information
-h, –help Show this help message

Commands:
list – show all paired devices
pair [timeout] – Try to pair within “timeout” seconds (1 to 255,
default 0 which is an alias for 30s)
unpair idx – Unpair device
info idx – Show more detailed information for a device
receiver-info – Show information about the receiver
In the above lines, “idx” refers to the device number shown in the
first column of the list command (between 1 and 6). Alternatively, you
can use the following names (case-insensitive):
Keyboard Mouse Numpad Presenter Trackball Touchpad

From here I could see that this was going to be super simple. As root, I ran this

ltunify pair

Then turned the mouse on immediately. As soon as the mouse paired the terminal returned to the command prompt. To verify the mouse was paired, I ran the command

ltunify list

To which I was happy to see that the new mouse was now paired along with the broken mouse I once had.

Devices count: 2
Connected devices:
idx=1   Mouse   Performance MX
idx=2   Mouse   M185

To remove that device no longer being used, that is just as easy as pairing

ltunify unpair 1

Now my receiver is happily paired exclusively with the new mouse for my Kitchen Command Center Computer and I am no longer encumbered by a buttonless touchpad, navigating around a spreadsheet, document or anything of that nature.

Final Thoughts

Logitech is pretty awesome for having this Unifying Receiver device. It makes losing a dongle to a Logitech mouse or keyboard not such a big deal. It even frees up ports as you can have one receiver paired with 6 devices. That, in my opinion, makes Logitech devices more valuable than others and so long as they keep up with this convenient-for-the-user focus. They will keep my business.

Further Reading

ltunify from software.opensuse.org

Logitech Unifying Receiver

Kitchen Command Center Computer: Dell Inspiron 20 3048 All-In-One Desktop

ltunify on GitHub

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USB or Removable Media Formatting in Linux

USB Drive-02.jpg

I am working on another project and whilst doing so, I was reintroduced to a kind of irritating problem with Desktop Linux. Nothing huge, just annoying enough. Formatting Removable or USB media. This is one area where I agree with the statement that Linux is not as easy to use as Windows. The Linux solutions work but it seems to lack some elegance.

Method #1: The Terminal

Before you start issuing any Format commands, be sure you know what the device name is. The way I prefer is by inserting the drive into the computer and and run in terminal:

dmesg

You’ll see a lot of text and toward the end look for something that reads like:

[109951.128820] sd 6:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg3 type 0
[109951.128995] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdc] No Caching mode page found
[109951.128997] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdc] Assuming drive cache: write through
[109951.135052]  sdc:
[109951.136745] sd 6:0:0:0: [sdc] Attached SCSI removable disk

That tells me that the device name is sdc and I know that it is mounted under /dev. So this USB drive is /dev/sdc

to verify run:

df -h

If your computer mounted the drive you can take a look at the listing. Somewhere you should see the last drive you plugged in along with the Size of the drive, How much is Used, How much Available, Use of drive as a percentage and where if anyplace it is mounted. In my case:

Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sdc        7.5G  946M  6.6G  13% /run/media/cubiclenate/XFER

For the following examples, replace the “X” with your particular drive letter.

Next you need to ask yourself, do you wish to share the contents of this drive with non-Linux machines. If the answer is “yes” than you will need to format in FAT or NTFS.

Format with FAT or in this case VFAT

sudo mkfs.vfat /dev/sdX

Format with NTFS (New Technology File System), more common since Windows XP

sudo mkfs.ntfs /dev/sdX

If this drive is just for you and your Linux buddies, go with a Linux file system. They are “better” in many ways.

Format with EXT4 File System

sudo mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdX

Or, if you are feeling it, go with XFS

sudo mkfs.xfs /dev/sdX

This process isn’t hard just not as straight forward to a new user and if you don’t spend your life in the terminal, these commands can easily be forgotten.

Method #2: Quick USB Formatter

A more graphical, KDE Plasma, friendly feeling option is this USB Format application. This is not in the Official openSUSE repositories.

https://software.opensuse.org/package/quick-usb-formatter

What is nice about this application is that it is very straight forward. After installation, just typing USB will bring this up in the menu / quick launcher as “USB Format”. The executable is located here:

/usr/bin/quickusbformatter

USB Format-01

The interface is very straight forward, you select the device, in this case /dev/sdc and it will NOT allow you to select your system drives so there is no shot at making a mistake here. You can select the file system but XFS is not an option. There is a field to type in a label if you so choose as well.

Downside to this interface is that you can’t manage the partitions should you want to delete or add partitions on this drive. Also note, I am not able to format anything in the build in SD Card reader. If these are not a concern then this may be a fine solution for you.

Method #3: Gparted

Perhaps my preferred method for managing storage medium is Gparted. This is the Gnome Partition Editor and is one of the finest pieces of software I have ever used. It just does everything I need to do in a nice, intuitive, easy to use and extremely powerful tool for managing disks. It is described as an “industrial-strength” application for for creating, destroying, resizing, moving, checking and copying partitions, and the filesystems on them.

Gparted is available for both Tumbleweed and Leap, to install:

sudo zypper in gparted

This “do everything tool” for your disks will require root privileges and rightfully so. You can create space on disk for new operating systems, or even copy the file systems.Gparted-01-sdc

This has access to all the drives on the system, mounted or not. Also note that modification to SD Cards, as expected, is also not an issue.

Gparted-05-SD Card.png

This application is fantastic in how you an resize and move partitions around on a drive. The designers have taken great care in paying attention to the finer details of disk interaction.

After you are satisfied with the disk modifications, you commit to the changes by a check box labeled “Apply All Operations”.

Gparted also removes all ambiguity in what is supported with each file system. There is a great report you can review under View > File System Support.

Gparted-02-File System Support

Final Thoughts

Managing USB or Removable media isn’t exactly the most straight forward if you are new to Linux. This might not be true for all distributions or desktop interfaces but my experience on KDE Plasma over many years has been as such. Maybe it shouldn’t be a straight forward process as a user should know what they are doing before they start making any changes to any pieces of hardware and maybe it is also a non-issue as most removable media is already formatted and ready to go.

If you have any other thoughts on interacting with removable media. Please share, I am interested in knowing if there are other or better options out there.

Further Reading

https://software.opensuse.org/package/quick-usb-formatter

https://software.opensuse.org/package/gparted

neofetch | Command-Line System Information Tool

My favorite system information tool is the KDE Plasma Information Center or kinfocenter. It tells me all the fun little bits about the computer. My second favorite tool is called neofetch. Neofetch is a command-line system information tool that displays an aesthetically pleasing output of information about your operating system, software and hardware. It shows the basic information about a system in Bash.

For information on the project, visit their GitHub Page.

Installation

Tumbleweed

This is available in the main openSUSE repository for Tumbleweed so installation is easy:

sudo zypper in neofetch

Leap 15 Install

sudo zypper ar http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/utilities/openSUSE_Leap_15.0/ Utilities

sudo zypper in neofetch

It takes very little time to install with three other dependencies required.

The application is pretty straight forward, just run it:

neofetch

It’ll give you your system information.

neofetch-01.png

The information, by default, is displays alongside the operating system’s logo in ASCII art. It can be configured differently, if you wish. I don’t know exactly how neofetch is fetching the this information but it is pretty cool display of information in the terminal. I particularly appreciate the ASCII Tumbleweed symbol.

It was a welcome surprise to see how many packages, rpm and snap, are installed in the system as well as the uptime. These are fun numbers and it would be fun to dig into the source code on this application.

There are some additional options you can play with, take a look at the man page:

man neofetch

Final Thoughts

That’s it, just a quick, fun system info tool to use in the terminal. It is practical and easy to use. If you are managing multiple machines and want to get a quick account of information remotely in the terminal, this would be a good choice. How often will you use it? Not sure, but it is still nice to have.

Resources

Neofetch on GitHub

More Fun Terminal Applications

A Very Basic Reference for Zypper on openSUSE

terminal-iconZypper is a great package manager tool and easy to use. Although I don’t have as much need for my notes as I once did, I like to keep them as a reference for me and a place to point to others. I find as I became more and more used to using it in the terminal it becomes second nature but you have to start somewhere. The manual,

man zypper

is a great, well written and complete reference but can be a bit overwhelming for someone brand new to openSUSE. The openSUSE wiki is also a great reference but it is geared more toward those with more experience, as it should be. This is just a very basic reference written to my inner 8th grader or for those that want to dabble or give package management in the terminal a try. After all, the terminal is not something to be afraid of, it is something to embrace and use as often as possible.

Zypper | Basic Reference

…because the terminal is a great place to live.

SCP | Secure Copy in the Terminal, Another Gift to Future Self

terminal-iconIn my journey to spend more time in the terminal and less on the fancy graphic user interfaces, I had to write this reference up for myself. This is not a complete usage of SCP, just the parts that I need that are most typical to what I need. I am also using this as a simple guide to lower that barrier of entry and encourage more people to communicate with the computer how the computer likes to communicate: In the Terminal.

SCP or Secure Copy, is quick and easy to use once you understand the syntax. I have used this in my last two projects and am going to make it a point to use it whenever it makes sense. Since I my ability to remember details can be shoddy, this reference will remind me as needed. Another note to my future self that will undoubtedly come in handy.

Secure Copy Reference Page

Future Self, you’ll thank me later, and you’re welcome.

RasberryPi Info Center

Rpi3_boardI have a RaspberryPi that is doing absolutely nothing. I got it to dink around with it but it just hasn’t been all that useful to me. I much prefer the x86 platform for, pretty much everything. Not so recently, my church expressed a need for a slideshow like machine for things, events, announcements, pictures and the like. Since I have a Pi3 doing absolutely nothing this sounded like a great fit.

Project Requirements

  • Low or no maintenance device that just rotates through a selection of pictures and a given interval
  • Add and remove content from the directory without the slide show software either skipping or borking
  • Be able to FTP into the Pi to drop pictures onto it.

I downloaded Rasbpian and to play along with the written recommendations, I downloaded the image writer, Etcher.

The Etcher AppImage is built against 32 bit architecture so some additional software was required for openSUSE Tumbleweed on a 64 bit architecture

sudo zypper install libXtst6-32bit libXss1-32bit gconf2-32bit

To start out, I needed to make sure I could remotely access this Pi through Secure Shell. I checked the status of the service

systemctl status ssh

I’m going to pause here just to say, Systemd rocks. What a great service for controlling services on Linux via the terminal. It makes using the terminal on different distributions quite comfortable.

The service was “dead” so I started and enabled the ssh service

sudo systemctl start ssh
sudo systemctl enable ssh

After much searching about, I landed on feh as the application to play a slideshow.

sudo apt-get install feh

To test it out, I needed to transfer some pictures to the Pi. Using my favorite file manager, Dolphin.

File Transfer to RPi

After the files had transferred. Ran a test command to see if it worked

feh -Y -x -q -D 5 -B black -F -Z -r /home/pi/Pictures/

And it worked smashingly… except if I added pictures it wouldn’t automatically update the images displayed and eventually, after taking away too many pictures the application borked. Upon scanning through the man pages…

man feh

I discovered an option,

-R, --reload int

This would allow for reloading the directory at a specified interval, int, in seconds. I set it for 15 seconds and gave it another series of successful tests, adding and removing images remotely.

feh -Y -x -q -D 5 -B black -F -Z -R 15 -r /home/pi/Pictures/

An explanation of the options:

-Y : Hide the mouse pointer

-x : Create borderless window

-q : quite, don’t report non-fatal errors

-D : Delay between slides

-B : background for transparent images “black” is the value

-F : Fullscreen

-Z : Zoom pictures to screen size in full screen

-R : Reload the file list, after a period of time in seconds

-r : Recursively expand any directories in the path

It all behaved just as I had hoped it would, so much so that I had that natural dose of endorphins for this little success. It was good to see that the Pi was doing just what I needed it to do.

Add FTP Service

Since it is likely there will be a Windows machine accessing the Pi, I wanted to make adding and removing images is as simple as possible. The best solution, I find, is to set up an ftp server. I tried using sftp but that is not something the Windows file manager can do.

I decided that I would go with proftp as that is the one for which I am most familiar.

sudo apt-get install proftpd-basic

Checked the status of the server, post install

systemctl status proftpd

The service reported that it was running and active. Should that not be the case for you simply run this to start and enable the service:

sudo systemctl start ssh
sudo systemctl enable ssh

Since this is an internal ftp server on a RaspberryPi with no need for multiple users. The default “pi” user was adequate and I used those credentials for ftp access.

Autostart Slideshow on Boot

I didn’t want to have to have anyone fiddle with the Pi should it lose power. It just needs to work. A script was necessary.

Created the folder bin in the home directory, because, that is just where I like to stick my scripts.

mkdir ~/bin

Changed Directory into that folder

cd ~/bin

Created script with all the right bits in my slideshow

nano slideshow.sh

Copy and paste this into the nano editor

#!/bin/bash

feh -Y -x -q -D 8 -B black -F -Z -R 120 -r /home/pi/Pictures/

Save it: Ctrl+o, Enter

Exit nano: Ctrl+x

Next you have to make the script executable

chmod +x slideshow.sh

Now it is possible to run the command in terminal

Since I want this thing to basically just be an appliance where you plug it in and it just does its thing. I need to make this script run when the RaspberryPi starts up.

To do this, I will use my trusty nano editor to edit the desktop startup

nano ~/.config/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart

Scroll to the bottom of this script and add this to the very end:

@/home/pi/bin/slideshow.sh

Save and Exit

Reboot the machine to test.

sudo systemctl reboot

Success.

Disable Screen Blanking

As I was testing the slide show program, I discovered that the screen blanks out after a period of time. That is an unacceptable state for this device. Sure, it makes it energy star compliant but it makes it real hard for people to see information from it. The fix is easy, though, it would have been easier if it was a point and click option in Raspbian.

Back in the terminal:

sudo nano /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf

Look for the heading

[Seat:*]

At the end of that rather large block of “options” add this line:

xserver-command=X -s 0 -dpms

Reboot the machine and test to see if it performs as expected. For me, this worked exactly as expected and I now call the project complete

Syncthing Addition

In order to keep things a bit simpler for the interested parties. I added Syncthing to the RaspberryPi. Just Syncthing, not the GTK GUI. The problem with the setup was that the browser would open up and cover up the slideshow, which, do an average observer could look like an error. The solution, was another autostart modification:

nano ~/.config/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart

I added this line:

@/usr/bin/syncthing/binary -no-browser

Now, should the RaspberryPi be rebooted, the Syncthing WebGUI will not sit in front of feh.

Final Thoughts

I am very glad the Internet exists with so many others describing how they solved their problems. I feel like I cheated because I was able to pick different solutions and mash them up to satisfy my requirements for a properly fitting and robust solution.

RPi3_slideshow

With rebooting the machine, I am rather impressed by how quickly the system goes from off to playing the slide show. A testiment to the work of the RaspberryPi folks hard work.

This was my first RaspberryPi experience and after completing the project, I am mostly happy with the whole process but ultimately, I think I would have preferred setting this all up on an x86 based machine. There were numerous little unique Pi niggles that I found annoying that kind of reminded me of noodling around in Linux circa 2005. At the same time, it was kind of a nice throwback to the last decade in working through a myriad of challenges to have a properly working computer.

For the technical adventurous, I highly recommend playing around with Raspberry Pi devices. It is certainly a great little hobby machine to perform special tasks. At the end of this project, I can think of several other things that I would like to do with a Raspberry Pi or similar device to solve other problems that come to mind.

References

Instructables Easy Raspberry Pi Screensaver Slideshow

Raspbian Download

Etcher

feh – Linux man page

How to Disable the Blank Screen on Raspberry Pi (Raspbian)

ProFTP.org

Web Browsing With w3m

w3m-09Sometimes it is just fun to hang out in the terminal and not use all this fancy graphical interface nonsense with annoying advertising, video, GIFs and popups. Since I didn’t “grow up” with this software, I needed to teach myself how to use it. The manual is very complete on w3m but there is much more there than what I need. So, here is my internal notebook on w3m turned public.

I use Konsole as my terminal application of choice on openSUSE. It has been my favorite for years and the default of KDE Plasma. If you would like a more retro terminal browsing experience that takes you back to a more exciting time in computer history, you can install Cool-Retro-Term.

Install the Browser

sudo zypper install w3m

Optionally if you want inline pictures, which can be ropey at times:

sudo zypper install w3m-inline-image

Basic Usage

Since you have already installed this using the terminal, adding anything about “open a terminal first” is a waste of text on the screen.

To initiate the program you must enter a target site for w3m.

w3m cubiclenate.com

Or maybe something that is more useful:

w3m duckduckgo.com

 

The nice thing about this web browser is that it is very “tab-key friendly.” Press Tab or left-click, into the search area. To enter text, press Enter.

w3m-01.png

The cursor will go to the lower left hand corner of the terminal with a TEXT: prompt, enter your text and hit Enter.

It will return your cursor back to the search line. Press the Tab or Right-Arrow key to take you to [Search] and press Enter.

w3m-03

Congratulations, you have completed your first search on w3m.

w3m-04.png

Navigation

Searching is great, but you need to know how to actually navigate with w3m.

Arrow-Up / Arrow-Down

Jumps from hyperlink to hyperlink

Enter, Right-Arrow, Left-Double-Click

Select hyperlink

Left-Arrow, Ctrl-b

Back Page

Right-Click Menuw3m-06-crop.png

If you are using w3m in a mouse enabled environment, as I would typically do, right-click anywhere on the screen and this handy little menu will pop up.

This is nice to have because you don’t have to remember the keystrokes. Although, the keystrokes are the whole reason I like using this browser. It give the mouse (or touchpad) a break.

More Nifty Web Browsing Commands

Reload Page

Ctrl-r

Open Link on New Tab

Ctrl-t

This will start another tab as you would expect from a modern browsers.

Switch Tab

Esc, t

Use up / down arrow keys to select the tab and press Enter

w3m-08.png

Close Tab

Esc, t

Shift+D

Open Page in External Browser

Shift+M

Your external browser preference can be adjusted to suit your needs, you can even add more browser options.

w3m-07.png

Final Thoughts

This is a handy browser that is incredibly light weight. It works very well in Konsole, although the images can sometimes bleed over onto the menu bar of the application.

I use this browser somewhat frequently, mostly on sites that have far too much Java code and hog memory resources. This browser displays the information that I want and tends to discard the undesirable cruft found on many sites. Also, if the site just won’t display well in w3m, it is a poorly made site.

If this browser works for you and you find this simple guide useful, great! If this isn’t something that works for you or you find this blathering a waste of your time it was barely 600 words so you aren’t out much time. I have been annoyed by some of the more feature rich browsers so w3m has been refreshing to use. Should this browser not meet your needs here are plenty of other web browser options out there that might do a better job. I primarily put this together for me anyway.

Further Reading

http://w3m.sourceforge.net/

w3m from openSUSE

Cool-Retro-Term

Helping Future Self with Network Control from the Terminal

I don’t have a regular need to interact the network there are times when I very much need to do so. My first exposure to controlling the network using the terminal was using ifconfig and I can’t seem to latch onto the “new” ip command in the same way I was able to with the previous. My problem is, I can’t ever seem to remember which resource it was that I liked best so, I’ve decide to make my own, very basic, resource. I have this with openSUSE as well as Raspian Linux. This is a gift to my future self for the next time I need to interact with the network.

Network Control from the Terminal

You’re welcome, Future Self.

Six Steps to a Simple Samba Setup on openSUSE

openSUSE Samba

openSUSE is a very polished, commercial-feeling distribution of Linux. The architects of the distribution have a much larger scope in mind of its usage than what I generally do. One such area is Samba, SMB or often referred to as Windows Network File and Printer Sharing Protocol. I only use this for one device on my network, my All-in-One, Printer-Scanner-Copier, The HP OfficeJet 8600. It is a fine machine that does what I need it to do very well, but for scanning to a network folder, I must use Samba.

This process used to be much simpler, many years ago, before the discovery of security issues within Samba. She short story of why there is the separation was some sort of vulnerability in the underlying system. I am sure there is a fairly simple or straight forward way to make it all work but my intent was to successfully set up Samba with as little effort as possible.

I had a resource out on the web someplace that told me how to do this simply but I couldn’t find the bookmark nor was there a link in my digital notebook so I took a few sites, what I know about openSUSE and created an easy step-by-step guide for getting Samba file sharing up and running. I have broken down the process into six easy to follow steps for a minimal setup. I use this to quickly and easily set up and use Samba with openSUSE Linux.

Six Steps to a Simple Samba Setup on openSUSE

Package Installation

Minimum number of packages required to install the Samba Server

Service Activation

System Services that need to be activated and installed

Firewall Configuration

Allow access to the server through the firewall

YaST Samba Setup

Basic configuration using openSUSE’s system configuration tool.

Adding Samba Users

Through the terminal, setting the username and password

Testing it all out

Making sure it actually works.

Final Thoughts

Samba is pretty easy to set up for a minimal usage. For something more involved and complex, there are certainly better ways of accomplishing it. Finally, if HP decided to put SFTP on their future All-in-One devices, this entire write up, to me, would be useless but until then, this is what is required.

Further Reading

Six Steps to a Simple Samba Setup on openSUSE

Samba on openSUSE Wiki

Samba.org

Dell Latitude E6440 all on SSDs

e6440-01-sm

I have wanted to upgrade the 500 GB SSHD hybrid drive in my Dell Latitude E6440 since I purchased it but i just wasn’t prepared to spend the asking dollars for a new SSD. The only adequate solution I determined reasonable was to go with a used SSD and just accept the risk that goes with used.

After much searching and bidding, I purchased a Micron M500 with 960GB SSD which ends up being 894GiB of storage. When it comes to SSDs this is NOT, by any stretch, considered top of the line. Here are the specs that many seem to be fixated.

  • Sequential 128KB READ: Up to 500 MB/s
  • Sequential 128KB WRITE: Up to 400 MB/s
  • Random 4KB READ: Up to 80,000 IOPS
  • Random 4KB WRITE: Up to 80,000 IOPS
  • READ/WRITE latency: 5ms/25ms (MAX)

Not the most performant drive but certainly much faster than the SSHD that I was using. If you are interested, here are the full specifications from Micron on this line of drives.

Since I already put the root and swap file system on a 128 GB mSATA SSD with very positive results, I was encouraged about how this upgrade was going to go. I could expect better performance with less power usage.

s-l1600

In preparation for upgrading, I did what any reasonably prudent, Linux using, data conscious, user would do. I backed up the contents of my home directory, well, another snapshot using Back In Time.

Performing the Modification

The great thing about every Dell Latitude I have ever owned is the ease of serviceability of the machines. No crazy tools are needed or long list of instructions to perform a simple modification. Just a small Phillips screw driver.

IMG_20180512_081253811.jpg

Two screws and the drive can be removed from it’s bay. The drive is held in place by these isolation rubber rails and a caddy cover. I appreciate this design, it is easily assembled, the rails have a nice, snug interference fit, and the caddy cover is held in place with a clip and screw.

SSD drive assembly

Troubles I Had

I am not sure what I did wrong but I couldn’t get the system to not look for the, to-be-replaced SSHD. I tried unmounting the drive before a reboot but still, it would continue to wait for the drive. The system would get stuck looking for the old drive and fsck didn’t correct the issue. I became impatient so I just decided to do a complete re-installation of the openSUSE Tumblweed, because I was too lazy to keep searching for a solution. There is probably a great simple solution that just escaped me.

Restoring the Data

There was a bit of a struggle in understanding how to restore the data from Back In Time into my home directory but once it was done, everything was back to normal. It took a bit longer than I expected but everything restored, all the files and settings. Like it never even happened…

A quick check of the SMART monitoring tools:

smartctl -a /dev/sda

=== START OF INFORMATION SECTION ===
Model Family: Crucial/Micron MX1/2/300, M5/600, 1100 Client SSDs
Device Model: Micron_M500_MTFDDAK960MAV
Firmware Version: MU05
User Capacity: 960,197,124,096 bytes [960 GB]
Sector Sizes: 512 bytes logical, 4096 bytes physical
Rotation Rate: Solid State Device
Form Factor: 2.5 inches
Device is: In smartctl database [for details use: -P show]
ATA Version is: ACS-2, ATA8-ACS T13/1699-D revision 6
SATA Version is: SATA 3.1, 6.0 Gb/s (current: 6.0 Gb/s)
Local Time is: Mon May 21 10:10:56 2018 EDT
SMART support is: Available – device has SMART capability.
SMART support is: Enabled

=== START OF READ SMART DATA SECTION ===
SMART overall-health self-assessment test result: PASSED

My favorite line is the last one that says the test result: “PASSED.”

Experience

I am running openSUSE Tumbleweed with KDE Plasma as my desktop environment. The aAverage energy consumption before the upgrade, using the SSHD plus the mSATA drive was 21 watts; under similar loads with the mSATA and the 2.5″ SSD, I am consuming about 17 watts. These numbers, are of course, just estimates at approximate similar loads. It is not a very well controlled power study. Between the two drives I now have a total of 945 GiB of storage available; the most I have had on a laptop.

Opening up Steam is much quicker than before. Starting a game does indeed load a lot quicker than it did on the SSHD. I didn’t take any before and after benchmarks but there is most certainly the feeling of increased speed in everything. The computer was no slouch before but now there is an increased sharpness in using it.

The computer is oddly quite with only the fan left as a moving part. However, the only time I notice there is a fan is when my hand goes past he vent and I can feel a little warmth coming from it. Logging in isn’t quite instantaneous, I do have to wait a few moments but I blame much of that on the fact I heavily use the Akonadi storage service for personal information management. I have more information than most people likely save but suffice to say, the machine starts very quickly.

I didn’t take any external thermal readings from the computer before the upgrade but it feels like the thing does operate a bit cooler. It is only an impression.

Final Thoughts

This Dell Latitude E6440 seems to have an extra boost of speed, as to be expected. What I didn’t expect was how much I notice the censorial changes of using this laptop now. I have used other solid state only machines before and didn’t think much of them. Perhaps their less than stellar keyboards out weighed the silence of their operation or possible that I use this machine more than most. Regardless, I appreciate the change.

Was the upgrade worth the price I paid for the drive? So far, yes, very much, indeed it was worth it, but as I did buy it used, and although it passed the health self-assessment, I don’t really know how long it is actually going to last. For now, it’s pretty great and I don’t think I would want to go back to “spinning rust” for storage.

External Links

Micron M500 Specs

Back In Time

128 GB mSATA SSD

My Dell Latitude E6440