TeamViewer 13 on openSUSE

openSUSE-TeamViewer 13-angle

I first started using TeamViewer version 12, last year and it has been a fantastic tool. I reviewed it very positively as it was a great tool for me to access my systems remotely. An often spoken criticism of TeamViewer was that it was a Wine application not a true native Linux application. Unless if you pointed it out or checked your system processes, you would really never know it. TeamViewer 12 was a fantastic application that ran extremely well on Linux.

What is TeamViewer?

TeamViewer allows you to remotely access and administer another machine and interact with it as almost as though you had physical access to it. This remote desktop application works very well even when the connection speed is poor. This is a commercial, closed-source application that runs on Windows, Mac, Linux, ChromeOS, Android and several others. It has a free for non-commercial version that I greatly encourage you to try out.

Installation

I started with getting the SUSE version from the TeamViewer downloads page. Since I most enjoy using the terminal to do the installation, I navigated to my Downloads folder and performed the install.

sudo zypper in ./teamviewer-suse_13.2.13582.x86_64.rpm

Your version number may vary.

A point of note, after the install, I recommend doing a repository refresh:

sudo zypper refresh

The installation of TeamViewer adds a repository and it will require you to either reject, trust temporarily, or trust always the GPG key for the repository. If you don’t do this the little update applet in the system tray will display annoying notifications periodically.

Changes Since Version 12

TeamViewer-13-2018-07-computers and contacts

A much unwarranted criticism of TeamViewer 12 was the usage of a Wine wrapper for the Linux version. TeamViewer 12 worked smashingly well, incredibly stable and performed well.

With TeamViwer 13, gone is the Wine Wrapper (and hopefully the sneering) as it is now a native Qt application. It admittedly has a more crisp and smoother appearance to it as compared to the previous version. The User Interface truly has a new level of polish. With this change, no features have been lost. It’s all still there.

Some of the Features

The tools are broken down into four sections: Actions, View, Communicate and Files & Extras.

The Actions Menu has options, just as you would expect. Some options are grayed out, presumably that they are premium features, but there is an option under End Session that will End the session and lock. It is nice to see that the Lock function works as you would expect on KDE Plasma.

TeamViewer-13-2018-06-Actions-cropped

The View section has options that seem very self-explanatory. Something to take note is the option to force an Optimize speed or Optimize quality of the remote session. If you have multiple monitors on the remote machine, switching between the monitors is easy and intuitive.

TeamViewer-13-2018-05-View-cropped

Under the Communicate section, there is the ability to chat with the remote user. Should you be doing tech help for a friend or family member, this can be very handy. I haven’t had a need to Switch sides with partner before but I can see where that would come in handy.

TeamViewer-13-2018-04-Switch Sides-cropped

Files & Extras has the option to do screen recording. A feature I can see very handy if you have to show someone how to do something and want them to have a record of it to refer back if needed. The Open file transfer tool is very valuable and super convenient when you have to send off a file as part of the tech help but I have used mostly to send a file to my home computer or the other way around when I am remote.

TeamViewer-13-2018-03-Files and Extras-cropped

Use Cases

My use cases haven’t changed much in the last year, outside of I don’t use it very often with mobile devices. I have found other ways to directly communicate with them using KDE Connect. Where I do use it most is to remote into my home system when I am remote. This is handy when I am working on a project and didn’t want to shut it down and take it with me or to check on a process. It is great to have the flexibility to remote into my home machine finish a project or continue plugging away at something when there is a some white-space in my day. The benefits of remote access to help out friends and family that, on the occasion, have tech questions is a fantastic time saver.

What I Like

TeamViewer-13-2018-02-CroppedThe menu items are the same but everything has a better look about it. The fonts and widgets are smoother and the Toolbar has a pleasant fade to translucent when the mouse moves away from the menu. TeamViewer continues to be very reliable and the same consistent performance. If I were to ever make a business in the Information Systems space, this as a fine solution to do remote desktop support. There are complaints about the expense of it but considering all the features, stability and general polish, the business case is there to use it. The $49 / month offering for a business that has regular need for it seems justifiable. I don’t have that much need for it and thankfully, you can use it for free for non-commercial use.

What I Like Less

The only one, small, regression I have noticed with version 13 is the process of adding new computers to my list. There wasn’t a right-click option to “add this computer” to my computer list. Adding a remote computer is easy enough doing it the manual way entering the ID and password of the machine. This is the only a minor annoyance I have noticed.

Final Thoughts

TeamViewer 13 has a whole new level of polish, has moved away from Wine and is a native Qt application. I am very impressed by the lack of regressions in making this rather significant transition. The application does feel a more responsive but that could just be me getting distracted by all the nice new polish. I didn’t perform any before and after benchmarks to verify.

I continue to be very thankful and grateful that this company builds a version compatible with openSUSE and would allow me to use TeamViewer for non-commercial purposes. I have become very accustomed to this tool and hope for many more years of usage out of it.

Further Reading

TeamViewer 12 on openSUSE Leap

TeamViewer

openSUSE

Wine

KDE Plasma Desktop

KDE Connect

Qt Cross-platform software development

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