Falkon Web Browser on openSUSE

Falkon on openSUSE.pngA web browser is a tool that is pretty much indispensable for day to day work and annoyingly, over the last few years they have become more and more memory hungry. My browser habits are as such that I am mostly using the web browser for research, gathering information and expanding my knowledge so very often, w3m is good enough for me most of the time but some sites just don’t read as well. My solution that has been working out for a few months now is the Falkon Web Browser, formerly known as QupZilla, it is a low memory and resource browser that is peppy and renders pages as expected. It uses the QtWebEngine which is based on Chromium but with any binary files and any auxiliary services that talk to Google platforms stripped out.

For the most part, I could exclusively use this browser but there are just a few things keeping Firefox open as my secondary browser.

Installation

Falkon, like anything else, is easy to install from the openSUSE repositories. I checked this time to be sure and it is available for both Leap and Tumbleweed… sure enough, it is in the official release repositories of both.

For the one-click method of install visit the openSUSE Software Site or alternatively, you can do it the fun and exciting terminal method

sudo zypper install falkon

If by some chance you don’t run openSUSE, check with your distribution’s software center or download it direct from Falkon here. They offer Windows binaries and an AppImage.

What It Does Well

If you read nothing else, read this: The biggest and most important thing this browser does is general web browsing, many, many tabs with almost no appreciable hit to memory. Even after having multiple tabs open for days, the memory doesn’t creep either. Somehow, Falkon is managing each tab as such that it doesn’t go all crazy over time. Sure, if you are running a big, beefy rig with 32 GiB of RAM, this isn’t an issue but running lowered powered hardware, this is an issue.

Falkon Browser-01-Start Page

Falkon is very fast and renders pages without any noticeable artifacts. Much less an issue with today’s browsers but some time ago, this has been an issue with lesser known browsers. Also, when using Falkon to post comments or create blathering pages (like this one), it doesn’t bog down over time.

Falkon Browser-04-openSUSE

Falkon comes with a built in ad blocker that can be turned off for sites as you wish with a click of the mouse. I leave the ad blocker on but turn it off for sites I use that depend on advertising dollars. I would consider this the best ad blocker but it filters out much of the cruft.

Falkon Browser-02-Preferences 11.png

Falkon looks great with a KDE Dark Theme. It fits in well with my desktop theme and has a pleasantly minimal look about it with few buttons and just feels clean. Visually, this is exactly how I want my desktop and browser to be which is fantastic. There are some other options in the preferences if you want to make it look less good, if that is what you are most accustomed.

Falkon Browser-02-Preferences 2.png

Browser history and bookmark manager are also what you would expect from any modern browser. I particularly like the interface but it is nothing that Chrome or Firefox are lacking.

Falkon Browser-06-Library

What It Doesn’t Do Well

It doesn’t do Flash but that isn’t such a big deal today. That means I use Firefox or Chrome to watch Homestarrunner.com videos. Most of the flash media on the web has seemingly disappeared. I’m still a fan of Flash… I might be the only one…

I can’t watch Netflix with Falkon as it doesn’t have the DRM Extension capability and there isn’t an extension that you can load to add the functionality. This is another “entertainment” activity, of which I am not generally using Falkon for anyway.

KDE Plasma Browser Integration is not an option but maybe will be in the future. I did some searching and couldn’t find any discussion on it but admittedly, I didn’t search very hard. This would be a nice function to add and would basically make Falkon almost “feature complete”.

I can’t do one-click install from the openSUSE Software Site and Telegram invite links will also not work in Falkon. These are actually the largest of issues for me with Falkon. My work around is just to use Firefox but it would be pretty great if Falkon could do this.

There are a limited number of extensions but truthfully, that is not a big deal for me as I generally don’t run any extensions… unless it’s Chrome but that is another story.

Why I Use It

I have found on numerous occasions that Chrome and to a lesser extent Firefox will start to memory creep over time. Using Chrome for a full workday with 6 or 8 tabs open will take up about 6 GiB of RAM and that is only having Gmail, Drive, Calendar and a few Google Documents open. On my machine with 16 GiB of RAM, this isn’t so much of an issue but on a 4 GiB laptop that I often use as a kind of side kick machine, this is an issue. This is so bothersome on the 4 GiB machine, I don’t bother with Chrome at all. It isn’t even usable but Falkon will do all the GSuite activities with a fraction of the memory resources without the memory creep. I can run that all day and not have a second thought about system resources.

Falkon Browser-07-Gsuite.png

Falkon doesn’t have any of the Google binary blobs doing unknown things. My primary reason for this is, I want my computer working for me, not working for someone else. I don’t need my computer cycles and electricity working to service a company unnecessarily and without my consent and I have no proof of this but I am starting to think that all this memory creep that happens in Chrome is largely due to those binary blobs.

Ultimately, I miss the days of using Konqueror as my daily web browser and this feels like a return to those good ol days some 12 years ago. Clean, simple and basic web browser that I feel like I can trust.

What I Wish It Would Do

Flash is on it’s way out so I don’t see the development team adding support for that at anytime. The next thing on my list would be the KDE Plasma Browser Integration. I do listen to some podcasts from some sites and I am able to start and stop the music using my Bluetooth headphones when using Firefox but not so with Falkon. That lack of functionality is unfortunate.

Another lacking point is having Smart Card Security Device integration. Just as I can set up Firefox and Chrome / Chromium with the Smart Card system, it would be nice to do so in Falkon.

Falkon isn’t able to open the appropriate software management program when using the One-Click install from the openSUSE Software site nor is it able to access web link invites for Telegram. If there was some way to shim it with an easy, user-level script, that would be great. I haven’t yet discovered (though, I haven’t looked) a way to do that but I am hoping it will in time.

Final Thoughts

Falkon is not what I would consider a “feature incomplete” browser but it is almost exactly as I want it. Simple and feature reduced. I don’t want my browser doing very much. I want its tasks to be limited to basic browsing and not gobble up memory resources.

This is a fantastic productivity browser. I use it for keeping tabs on different sites and bits of information handy as I go down my rabbit holes. Having multiple tabs open is also not an issue as Falkon does a good job of memory management and doesn’t start memory creeping when left open. It is rock solid and has yet to crash on me.

I highly recommend giving Falkon a spin. See if it will work for you. You just might be glad you did.

References

Download Falkon Browser

Falkon Browser Project Page on GitHub

Plasma Browser Integration

W3M Browser

More about the QtWebEngine

Falkon from openSUSE Repositories

Smart Card Security Device Integration Instructions

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TeamViewer 13 on openSUSE

openSUSE-TeamViewer 13-angle

I first started using TeamViewer version 12, last year and it has been a fantastic tool. I reviewed it very positively as it was a great tool for me to access my systems remotely. An often spoken criticism of TeamViewer was that it was a Wine application not a true native Linux application. Unless if you pointed it out or checked your system processes, you would really never know it. TeamViewer 12 was a fantastic application that ran extremely well on Linux.

What is TeamViewer?

TeamViewer allows you to remotely access and administer another machine and interact with it as almost as though you had physical access to it. This remote desktop application works very well even when the connection speed is poor. This is a commercial, closed-source application that runs on Windows, Mac, Linux, ChromeOS, Android and several others. It has a free for non-commercial version that I greatly encourage you to try out.

Installation

I started with getting the SUSE version from the TeamViewer downloads page. Since I most enjoy using the terminal to do the installation, I navigated to my Downloads folder and performed the install.

sudo zypper in ./teamviewer-suse_13.2.13582.x86_64.rpm

Your version number may vary.

A point of note, after the install, I recommend doing a repository refresh:

sudo zypper refresh

The installation of TeamViewer adds a repository and it will require you to either reject, trust temporarily, or trust always the GPG key for the repository. If you don’t do this the little update applet in the system tray will display annoying notifications periodically.

Changes Since Version 12

TeamViewer-13-2018-07-computers and contacts

A much unwarranted criticism of TeamViewer 12 was the usage of a Wine wrapper for the Linux version. TeamViewer 12 worked smashingly well, incredibly stable and performed well.

With TeamViwer 13, gone is the Wine Wrapper (and hopefully the sneering) as it is now a native Qt application. It admittedly has a more crisp and smoother appearance to it as compared to the previous version. The User Interface truly has a new level of polish. With this change, no features have been lost. It’s all still there.

Some of the Features

The tools are broken down into four sections: Actions, View, Communicate and Files & Extras.

The Actions Menu has options, just as you would expect. Some options are grayed out, presumably that they are premium features, but there is an option under End Session that will End the session and lock. It is nice to see that the Lock function works as you would expect on KDE Plasma.

TeamViewer-13-2018-06-Actions-cropped

The View section has options that seem very self-explanatory. Something to take note is the option to force an Optimize speed or Optimize quality of the remote session. If you have multiple monitors on the remote machine, switching between the monitors is easy and intuitive.

TeamViewer-13-2018-05-View-cropped

Under the Communicate section, there is the ability to chat with the remote user. Should you be doing tech help for a friend or family member, this can be very handy. I haven’t had a need to Switch sides with partner before but I can see where that would come in handy.

TeamViewer-13-2018-04-Switch Sides-cropped

Files & Extras has the option to do screen recording. A feature I can see very handy if you have to show someone how to do something and want them to have a record of it to refer back if needed. The Open file transfer tool is very valuable and super convenient when you have to send off a file as part of the tech help but I have used mostly to send a file to my home computer or the other way around when I am remote.

TeamViewer-13-2018-03-Files and Extras-cropped

Use Cases

My use cases haven’t changed much in the last year, outside of I don’t use it very often with mobile devices. I have found other ways to directly communicate with them using KDE Connect. Where I do use it most is to remote into my home system when I am remote. This is handy when I am working on a project and didn’t want to shut it down and take it with me or to check on a process. It is great to have the flexibility to remote into my home machine finish a project or continue plugging away at something when there is a some white-space in my day. The benefits of remote access to help out friends and family that, on the occasion, have tech questions is a fantastic time saver.

What I Like

TeamViewer-13-2018-02-CroppedThe menu items are the same but everything has a better look about it. The fonts and widgets are smoother and the Toolbar has a pleasant fade to translucent when the mouse moves away from the menu. TeamViewer continues to be very reliable and the same consistent performance. If I were to ever make a business in the Information Systems space, this as a fine solution to do remote desktop support. There are complaints about the expense of it but considering all the features, stability and general polish, the business case is there to use it. The $49 / month offering for a business that has regular need for it seems justifiable. I don’t have that much need for it and thankfully, you can use it for free for non-commercial use.

What I Like Less

The only one, small, regression I have noticed with version 13 is the process of adding new computers to my list. There wasn’t a right-click option to “add this computer” to my computer list. Adding a remote computer is easy enough doing it the manual way entering the ID and password of the machine. This is the only a minor annoyance I have noticed.

Final Thoughts

TeamViewer 13 has a whole new level of polish, has moved away from Wine and is a native Qt application. I am very impressed by the lack of regressions in making this rather significant transition. The application does feel a more responsive but that could just be me getting distracted by all the nice new polish. I didn’t perform any before and after benchmarks to verify.

I continue to be very thankful and grateful that this company builds a version compatible with openSUSE and would allow me to use TeamViewer for non-commercial purposes. I have become very accustomed to this tool and hope for many more years of usage out of it.

Further Reading

TeamViewer 12 on openSUSE Leap

TeamViewer

openSUSE

Wine

KDE Plasma Desktop

KDE Connect

Qt Cross-platform software development

Upgrade Reliability of openSUSE Tumbleweed

AspireOne_TumbleweedFor fun… or maybe negligence… I hadn’t updated one of my openSUSE Tumbleweed netbooks. As a rolling distribution of Linux, it is generally considered in bad form to not keep it updated as it will likely break the installation. Not so with Tumbleweed.

The System

Acer Aspire One D255E Netbook

  • Intel Atom CPU N455 @ 1.66GHz
  • 2 GB DDR3 Memory
  • 250 GB HDD
  • Intel GPU with 1024×600 screen resolution
  • Runs openSUSE Tumbleweed with KDE Plasma
  • Last updated 02 May 2018,
  • Kernel 4.16.7
  • KDE Plasma 5.12.4
  • KDE Framework Version 5.45.0
  • QT Version 5.10.0

sudo zypper dup

After updating the repositories and some churning a couple repository switches for two packages, there were a total of 2902 packages to be downloaded and installed. This included:

  • Kernel 4.18.0
  • KDE Plasma version 5.13.4
  • KDE Frameworks Version: 5.48.0
  • Qt Version 5.11.1

After about two hours of that little netbook cranking away, downloading and installing, the upgrade was complete. The machine rebooted without a single incident. Not a bit of strange behavior or fiddling required to use the computer. It just worked.

I was curious to know, how many snapshots were released since the last update. According to this page,  there were 54 snapshots released by the Tumbleweed team. That means there were enough changes to spin up a new ISO of Tumbleweed 54 times!

How does it run?

Upon the system settling, I wanted to check the memory usage. A total of 489 MiB was being used by the system. Since Firefox and Chrome tend to be a bit heavy to use, I installed Falkon Web Browser and started to dink around a little bit. The machine is obviously a bit slow but runs well enough to be useful. Monitoring CPU usage, there were few spikes or periods of the CPU maxing out. I am impressed by how few resources that are actually being used.

As far as how performant this machine is? It’s not. Not at all nor do I expect it to be. I don’t know that this machine is any slower than when it originally Ran Windows 7 Starter but comparatively to other systems, it can be just a bit painful to use outside of casual web browsing but it does play Tux Racer quite well.

Final Thoughts

I am impressed by how well openSUSE Tumbleweed can tolerate not being updated for an extended period of time. Two major kernel revisions, Qt version jump, and a KDE Plasma version jump and not a single things is broken even after missing 54 snapshots. Truly a testament to the hard work of all those involved in building and maintaining openSUSE Tumbleweed.

As far as the hardware goes. I really like the size of this netbook; the keyboard is almost full size and it is preferred over a tablet for most purposes and it stands up on its own without any special case. The battery life is still good after 8 years of use and although it feels a BIT flimsy, the build quality is as such that it has survived more than one drop without any catastrophic damage. When this finally goes, I would strongly consider another of the same form factor and build quality.

As with anything, your mileage may vary. Not everyone has the same successes and failures in their cases. I have pretty ordinary hardware so I seem to have constant success with openSUSE Tumbleweed as a very stable and robust platform to run on my machines.

References

Tumbleweed Changes and ISOs

Acer Aspire One D255E Netbook

Falkon One-Click Install for openSUSE

FreeCAD First Timer

FreeCAD Logo

I have had a need for doing 3D CAD work in Linux but I don’t have the budget to invest in any  high dollar software to hobby around. FreeCAD fit the bill. It’s a free and open source 3D CAD modeler but it does a bunch of other things too. Although I could probably run something through Wine or in Virtual Machine, I don’t want to get further locked into proprietary software that doesn’t support Linux. The CAD package I am most familiar with is PTC Creo, formally Pro/Engineer and Wildfire. It is a fine piece of software that I am very adept and creating whatever I can dream up.

The problem with Creo is, even if I could afford to purchase a license, the software doesn’t run on Linux. PTC used to support Linux but does not any longer, which is very unfortunate.

After trying a few things, I have settled on FreeCAD as my open sourced software of choice. At the time of writing, I am running FreeCAD v 0.17. FreeCAD is written in C++ and Python and is extensible so it allows for you to create functions in Python. This is a 3D CAD, BIM, FEM modeler. At this time, I only do Mechanical CAD (Computer Aided Drafting) work with it but am interested in BIM (Building Information Modeler) and FEM (Finite Element Method) modules as well. More on those at another time.

Installing FreeCAD in openSUSE is can be done using the 1-Click method or my favorite method, through the terminal:

sudo zypper install FreeCAD

I wasn’t completely vanilla in using FreeCAD as I used it as a part viewer for years but I hadn’t taken the time to create any any parts in it. After watching a video from Sudo Sergeant on using FreeCAD, I was able to see how too use the different functions. I was rather inspired to try it myself.

Running FreeCAD for the first time you are welcomed with a pleasant start center. Since I am most focused on part design, that was the Workbench that I selected.

Screenshot_20180703_092729

My only initial displeasure with the usage of FreeCAD was the color gradient of the background.

Screenshot_20180703_092804

I am quite sure it is the most acceptable default for most but it is a bit too bright for me. I like everything to be dark. This is easy enough to fix by opening the preferences dialog box.

Edit > Preferences…

Screenshot_20180703_092900

Select Display then the Colors Tab where you can change your gradient however you like.

Screenshot_20180703_092919

The Combo View pane is real nice at guiding you through the process of designing parts the way FreeCAD wants you to do it. I find this to be just a bit better than how Creo does it. Unless you KNOW how to use Creo, you won’t know where to get started. FreeCAD, on the other hand will begin guiding you after you select Create body you can begin with your first sketch.

Screenshot_20180703_093143

From here you can select to Create sketch or Start Boolean from the Task tab, the menu or the toolbar icons. Thankfully, FreeCAD doesn’t have the silly Ribbon interface. You can move your icon groups around any way you like.

When starting a sketch FreeCAD will create your 3 basic datum planes, immediately. You just have to determine the default orientation of your part you are designing. It should be noted, those that are more accustomed to video game 3D think of the X and Y of the screen with Z being depth through the world. With engineering, you swap the Y and the Z axis. Z is the height of the part while Y goes “into the screen” as it were.

Screenshot_20180703_093224

For my purposes, I am going to build this part as though I was looking down at it on a table. This is, of course, design intent dependent.

In going through the process of constraining the sketch, the picks and clicks are a bit different then Creo but the concepts are the same. One area where FreeCAD shines is the listing of constraints in the Left-panel Combo view. I would appreciate this feature in Creo.

Once the sketch is complete, the next step is to “pad” the sketch into the 3rd dimension which is nothing more than selecting the pad tool and setting the depth and direction of extrusion.

Screenshot_20180705_123905

As the model grows in complexity, you can take advantage of some of the other padding tools, such as to pad to a selected face of the part. A similar feature I use frequently in Creo, though, named differently.

The next task is to add rounds or fillets to the part. For FreeCAD the process is a bit different than what I’m used to but still makes perfectly logical sense. Select the edges you want to add rounds and select Fillet tool.

Screenshot_20180705_124125

It is possible to add multiple edges and later edit the feature to change references or values.

Screenshot_20180705_124146

I do appreciate, again, the left-side panel that displays valuable information when you are going through the process.

The process for adding chamfers is the same as fillets. FreeCAD also respects the practice of rounds and chamfers following along tangent edges.

Screenshot_20180705_125136

Although I am used to an extrude feature that is either adding or removing material, FreeCAD separates out similar functions, one for adding, the other for removing material. In this case, I want to create a “pocket” from a sketch. The options for how to remove material does what I need. You can do a blind cut at a depth of your choosing, through all, to a selected surface and so forth.

Screenshot_20180705_130006

For this part, I want a through hole

Screenshot_20180705_130050

Then I want a chamfer around the hole… just because.

Screenshot_20180705_165057

What I like

This is very easy to use, stable and quite feature rich. There are a few things I cannot do with FreeCAD that I would like but that is just another reason to get involved in the project.

FreeCAD is built using the Qt toolkit so it just looks great and respects my KDE Plasma Theme. Everything has that fine Qt polish that really makes for a great user experience. I don’t like light-in-color user interface so this alone makes FreeCAD nicer to work with than Creo.

What I don’t Like

There is no assembly module that I could get to work, however, there is a module that is actively being worked on. I have not yet been able to get it to work for me but it is only a matter of time before I’ll have it working. It is likely that this module will be included in the future releases as well.

Final Thoughts

FreeCAD is a fine piece of software that is easy to use. You really just have to get into it and play around a bit. This is a fine parametric modeler. There are a few “niggles” about the application but I have yet to use any piece of 3D design software that doesn’t have it’s own flavor of niggles.

The only thing I can’t do, at this time, with FreeCAD is create an assembly. It is being actively worked on so it is only a matter of time before it is possible without having to fiddle with the software.

I have started to use FreeCAD for all my little side projects instead of the commercial software from my employer. It is just as easy to use, well, maybe easier to use, actually, since FreeCAD guides you through the process very nicely. I hope to see this project continue to grow and improve. Although I have only scratched the surface of what FreeCAD can do, I am already impressed.

For more information or to get involved check out their site at FreeCADweb.org

If you find this to be useful software and would like to support the project you can do so here.

I really encourage you to check it out. It’s available for Linux, Windows and a slightly dated version for MacOS here.

Further Reading

openSUSE 1-Click Install for FreeCAD

FreeCAD on GitHub

FreeCAD Website

Sudo Sergeant FreeCAD video

Help FreeCAD

Adobe Acrobat Pro Alternative with XFA Extension on openSUSE | Master PDF Editor

Edit-pdfFor better or worse the PDF format seems to have become the de facto standard in digital documents. Generally, when I just want to view or quickly bang-out a form on a PDF, the KDE Plasma default Okular works just fine. The problem I have run into is with US government forms that have a XFA extension. Outside of that Okular is very capable. Features:

  • It has several supported formats: PDF, PS, Tiff, CHM, DjVu, Images, DVI, XPS, ODT, Fiction Book, Comic Book, Plucker, EPub, Fax
  • Thumbnails sidebar
  • Annotations support

In my search for not running a Windows VM to fill out an XFA encumbered form, I have recently stumbled upon a solution that is working really well for me.

Master PDF Editor

This is a real good looking application by Code Industry. It has a very easy to use, familiar feeling, User Interface. The application seems to be efficiently written as it literally pops right open as nice and quick as you would get from Okular. If you load it from menu or krunner, you are greeted with a friendly start page. I greatly appreciate that this is a Qt 5 application as it looks good with the rest of my dark themed desktop.

Screenshot_20180426_141326

Installation

It is mighty wonderful that the company lets you use it for free. It is a feature reduced version but allows you the opportunity to use it at no cost. For openSUSE Leap and Tumbleweed, I selected the CentOS/Redhat 7.x + version is it built on Qt5. Download the RPM and install it as you would any other sand alone package.

Personally, I like the zypper terminal method:

zypper in ~/Downloads/master-pdf-editor-4.3.89_qt5.x86_64.rpm

Alternatively, right-click Open with Discover or Open with Install/Remove Software works well too.

What is wrong with the default PDF options?

The main reason for my search for a different PDF reader was for the XFA extension that seems to be popular in government use on Forms. Even the built-in reader on Firefox and Chrome give me this little gem of an error.

Screenshot_20180428_225511

For a specific part-time job of mine, I need to be able to interact with PDFs properly and I would really prefer not to start up a Windows VM just to type out a few things in Adobe Reader. I would just install Adobe Reader but it is too old and unmaintained in Linux so it is hit but mostly miss if it will actually work not to mention the weird system tray icon it leaves me that requires me to kill the process to get rid of it.

If you like Master PDF Editor, it is not an expensive application to fork over some cash towards. My determination for whether or not I was going to commit to purchasing it was how stable it was and did it have all the features I wanted. While I can get by on using Okular for most things, there is something to be said for a more “feature complete” application like Master PDF Editor. Also, I have no problem paying for commercial Linux software. If it does it’s job, I am more than happy to pay for it.

Another handy feature in this application is the ability to digitally sign documents from a .pfx/.p12 certificate. Creating one may be a bit of a challenge but it is a nice feature to have.

Although it is not a feature I use regularly, having Optical Character Recognition (OCR) is great to have when you do need it. I tested it out and it is very good. Not 100% but close enough to be incredibly useful. English was installed by default on mine and I have 70 other language options available if I so choose. Another neat feature is the ability to go manually go through the OCR process to ensure correctness.

Master_PDF_Editor_OCR-01

Since I manage all of my documents, not in a physical filing cabinet but by a digital one, I need to be able to organize and combine different PDF Documents. My method of storage isn’t anything fancy, just a folder of records that is divided in a way that makes most sense to me. I often have to combine or remove pages out of a collection pages and this software makes it easy to complete.

A lesser needed but nice to have feature is the ability to create your own fallible, PDF documents. If you have used other form creators, you won’t find this foreign at all. It has the features I have used before but form creation is not my one of my strong suits. That is an art, in of itself that I do not posses the skill or patience to craft beautifully.

Features I use regularly

Adding and removing PDF pages from a file and save them for archival purposes. Something I cannot do from Okular easily. Since I try to minimize the amount of physical documents that I keep down to only the “must be original” documents. I scan and store the rest. You may ask, how often do I review these documents? ANSWER: More of then than I would like to admit. Also, do you know how liberating it is to not have a full 4 drawer filing cabinet?

Secondly, I use this program with any PDF documents that have the XFA extension. This is also a “feature” that keeps me using PDFs more than I would like. There is a continent “Click to Highlight Fields” in the upper right-hand corner of the application window and away you can go filling these things out.

Final Thoughts

I very happily forked over the cash to be able to do the work I want to do in Linux. I also want to be able to support the developers and make Linux a viable platform to target. I hate hearing from commercial vendors in my field of work that they just don’t have the demand to develop on Linux. Code Industry is taking a risk by developing for Linux and I certainly don’t want them to give up and say there is no market for Linux Desktop.

Screenshot_20180426_215701

If you would like to give Master PDF Editor a try, there is a free no obligation version that you can try out. Download the free version of Master PDF Editor and see what you think of it. Even though I don’t need the paid features on this software, I want to support the developer so I kicked them the cash for the registered version. I hope they continue to develop and improve this product. It’s already great and I am hoping it becomes even greater.

External Links

Okular PDF Reader

Code Industry Home Page

Get Master PDF Editor from Code Industry