Send and Receive Text Messages SMS with Element

What makes Matrix uniquely different from other messaging platforms is the ability to have bridges to other chat services. Matrix has all the signs of being the great chat unification platform that adequately reduces complexity in communication. Element feels complete, well polished and is enjoyable to use so using Element as my front-end, I should be able to access many of my various chat platforms that I am in quite nicely.

I will describe the process to set up a SMS Matrix bridge utilizing the appropriately named project SmsMatrix. The instructions on the GitHub project page are adequate and I want to supplement that with some more explanation and my experience in using it.

Bottom Line Up Front: The SMS Matrix bridge is fantastic. Although I am still in the early stages of using it, I truly believe it will streamline my SMS communication and it will hopefully reduce the likelihood of missing incoming messages in the future.

Step 1 – Create Bot account on Matrix

As per the project GitHub readme, there is currently there is no end-to-end encryption implemented in this SmsMatrix so it is advisable to use our own Matrix server. Since SMS itself is not a secure form of communication and since I don’t have the wherewithal nor desire to do this, I will happily use the Matrix.org server for the time being. This could change in the future.

My first step is to create a matrix account for my “Bot”. To do this, I navigated to element.io to create a new account. On the initial page there is a button to “Try Element”, select it.

The top option, and the one you should select is “Open in your Browser.” It is advisable to set up the bot using Element as it is is very straight forward and easy to do.

Next you will need to create the account for your bot. I recommend it is something you understand well and while you are at it, go ahead and store it in your password manager, Bitwarden, because what else is there really?

Once you verify via email the Matrix account, you will have to decide how you wish to safeguard against losing access to encrypted messages. Here you can generate a Secure Key for this bot. Although it isn’t really necessary for this purpose, due to the lack of end-to-end encryption with SmsMatrix, you will have to do that or enter a security phrase. Either way, you can store that information in Bitwarden, once again.

Go ahead and leave that browser window open, for the time being. You may want to refer back to it at some point. At least, I did.

Step 2 – Install SmsMatrix

This has a sub-step of setting up F-Droid. If you already have F-Droid installed, skip down a bit. This is necessary since SmsMatrix isn’t in the Google Play store and I want to keep it updated and not think much about it. Alternatively, You can just install the SmsMatrix APK.

To install F-Droid is pretty simple. Navigate to the page and select the blue “Download F-Droid” button on the home page.

There are a few steps involved in making F-Droid work on your system but it is straight forward. Download the APK, side-load (install) it, you will be required to set the permissions of your mobile device to allow it. Once installed, open up F-Droid and search for SmsMatrix in the store. If you find that I should add that information here, let me know.

Step 3 – Configure SmsMatrix

The configuration of SmsMatrix is very straight forward. Use the Bot Username and Password previously set up. Since you use the convenient Bitwarden password manager, this step will be no problem at all.

Enter the Homeserver url, which, in my case is the matrix.org server.

Enter the Devicename, which can be whatever you want.

Finally, I left the SyncDelay and SyncTimeout just as it was by default.

Select “Save” and you are done. Wait for your next text message to arrive and you will be pleasantly surprised, 12 seconds later!

Step 4 – Profit

Profit from the convenience, that is. When you receive your next text message, the bot will create a chat with your user account, place it in the “People” section, and rename the account to the phone number or contact information if you have it in your address book. Within that chat, you are able to respond to the message, just as you would any other Matrix chat and the message will send out to the recipient.

Another fun little note is that if you change or update the contact name, the next SMS you receive, the bot will update that account name. I found that to be very slick.

What I Like

All SMS messages you receive are right there in your list of direct messages in the People section. Sending a message to an SMS recipient or a Matrix recipient is no different from your perspective. It quite literally doesn’t matter and to the other end of the SMS, they will not know the difference.

What is such a slick feature is that SmsMatrix will update the chat, automatically, to whatever the contact is in your address book. I was amazed to see this and was pleasantly surprised by this fantastic feature.

This bridge makes SMS so much more accessible. I don’t like to actually have my phone in my hand or near me much of the time. When I arrive home, it tends to get plugged into the charger and set in the corner of the kitchen on the counter and often forgotten about unless there is a rare occasion of a phone call… which is often just a robocall.

What I Don’t Like

I don’t see a way to initialize a text message from Element to an SMS recipient. I tried several things, unsuccessfully such as [phone number]@smsbot:matrix.org but that didn’t work. As far as I can figure out at this time, the only thing I can do is respond to an SMS conversation. This is sort of unfortunate as it does require me to use my phone just a bit more than I would like. I truly have no idea how you would implement access to the address book and start a conversation but it sure would be a welcomed addition. Element / Matrix is real close to just replacing the need to use my phone or some other web interface to access my SMS so it doesn’t make for a complete interface but it is so very close. Once you get the conversation going, you are golden.

There is no message history, available through the Element client. Based on how SmsMatrix initializes the chat, I don’t see how you would anyway. Not a deal breaker but combine that with the need to start the conversation from the phone, it does make for a bit of context loss in the conversation thread.

After establishing the SmsMatrix bridge, should I send a message from the phone, SmsMatrix won’t show that message in the Matrix conversation thread. This could be a problem, depending on how you end up using SMS from that point forward. This also makes the bridge just a bit… fiddly or at least not exactly a solid-feeling experience.

Final Thoughts

I have only been using Element for a short while on openSUSE and so far, I am quite happy with it. I have not yet found anything irritating about it. It is a bit more spartan than Telegram as it doesn’t have all the fun little things like gifs and the breadth of stickers. What makes Element / Matrix so exciting is the bridging capability and the SMS Bridge, although, not perfect it is really quite fantastic. I will just have to make sure that I use the mobile Element client to respond to messages and resist using the SMS application

I have shamefully been using messages.google.com for messaging from my desktop to send SMS. I can say now, that I am no longer using it. I suppose I can keep it bookmarked for those occasions where I have to initiate an SMS but once a conversation is established, using Element would be the way to go.

Assuming that Element / Matrix isn’t too resource intensive, I think this might be my modern day solution for a unified messaging platform. I will see as I continue to use it, and add more bridges. I am incredibly optimistic that I will be able to make my communication on the various platforms much easier and hopefully, leave fewer messages unread. Next step, Facebook Messenger. I don’t particularly enjoy Facebook Messenger, the interface is awfully slow and cumbersome. If that works well, I will most certainly espouse the glory of Matrix… some more.

References

https://matrix.org/bridges/
Element | Matrix Chat Client on openSUSE
https://element.io/
https://f-droid.org/

Element | Matrix Chat Client on openSUSE

All the kids have been talking about the wonders of Matrix as the future of decentralized, secure communication. I have known about it, seen bridges being used in the openSUSE discord and Telegram rooms. Most of my experience has not been great, generally there were significant delays. I have used a few clients, Riot.im on a web client, which I didn’t care for and I also used Quaternion a Qt based client but I have had issues with the encrypted messages bit. I found the user experience to be rather… lack-luster at best. Mostly, I found the whole thing quite confusing. Accessing new rooms wasn’t self-evident, understanding what Matrix is and isn’t was confusing and I therefore found it frustrating to use. My experience, has been that I really preferred Telegram for communication.

A revived curiosity came about when I heard of the splendors of Matrix being espoused by the folks on Destination Linux; Noah and Ryan especially. They really pushed the idea that this is the future of communication. I still mostly dismissed it, thinking that my Telegram experience was satisfactory. Then I heard Noah talk about how Matrix has revolutionized his communication workflow. Matrix has opened up functionality of which specifically, he described how he can text message, as in SMS, on Matrix. Now I was truly intrigued and decided that it was time to look into this once again. I could endure the pain of learning this to eliminate my SMS frustrations.

I know I could use the Element web client for Matrix but I don’t like web clients. If I have to have a browser open to use an application, I do not like the experience, it feels disconnected. Now if you wrap that web app in something like electron and make it feel like a part of the system, that changes things. They feel more complete like a real application and give me what is quite important an icon in my system tray that notifies me of activity. The emphasis here is, I want a system tray indicator of messages or activity. Any communication application that doesn’t give me this is immediately on the chopping block with a need to be replaced. Element meets my criteria and the process began again for using it. I checked the openSUSE Software Repositories and Snap Store, but it wasn’t available. It does, however, exist as a Flatpak (at the time of writing).

Setup Flatpak and Flathub Repository

The first step is to set up Flatpak and the main repository Flathub to get access to the Element-Desktop Flatpak. Generally speaking, Flatpak is set up on most distributions. At least, most distributions don’t make it difficult to get going if not already configured for you.

Though I am gearing this towards using openSUSE, there are instructions for other distributions available. You can go here for the Quick Setup for openSUSE or stay here and I’ll provide the quick, down and dirty ways to get it going. For those that prefer the click around and install, navigate here for the click to direct install method.

https://software.opensuse.org/package/flatpak

or you can use the more fun method and install it in terminal

sudo zypper install flatpak

Next, add the Flathub repository, in terminal, as root run this. If the Flathub repository is already set up on your system, it will not add another (see the --if-not-exist bit on the command).

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo

Optional Additional step is to install the Discover graphical application explorer backend so you can graphically explore and install Flatpak applications.

sudo zypper install discover-backend-flatpak

Now you are set with installing Element or any other Flatpak for that matter.

Installation of Element

I am presenting three methods of installing Element on openSUSE. Though, the third method my make the previous instruction of setting up the Flathub repo redundant.

Method One – Terminal

The quick and easy way to install Element is from the command line because the command line is awesome.

sudo flatpak install im.riot.Riot

Unfortunately, Flatpak application names are kind of silly in comparison to Snaps but I am sure for good reason. Read through and agree with the changes.

Method Two – Graphical with Discover

The graphical way may indeed be less confusing. Since Discover, the KDE graphical application explorer has been pretty great as of late, I recommend it for exploring Flatpak applications. It is as simple as searching for “Element” and you will get the green and white logo at or near the top of the list, selecting it and install.

The nice thing about Discover is that you can scroll down and see the source of the package. If there was another source for Element available, you can very easily select the source repository. It’s a real nice feature of Discover.

Method Three – From the Flathub website

Finally, You can also use the install file from the Flathub website where you will be provided a *.flatpakref file that some application managers like Discover can unpack and utilize.

https://flathub.org/apps/details/im.riot.Riot

I didn’t actually test it but it should work… maybe… if it doesn’t, be sure to let me know.

With whatever method you choose, it installs and integrates quite nicely into your menu and is immediately executable. There is no funny business to be had, weird hacks or changes that are necessary to run the thing. It is simply, install and go.

First Run and Impressions

When I started up Element, I was greeted with the login screen. It has a clean and modern feel to it that looks like time was taken to give the right visual appearance.

Since I remembered my Username and Password using my brain-backup, Bitwarden. Next you are going to have to authenticate your session. If you have created a passphrase on your other session of Element, this is where you can enter it. If you haven’t done this, you can verify it later. I skipped this step for now so I can show you a really cool way you can verify your session.

After skipping this, you are presented with your Matrix session. Since I have been using it for a little while now, I have a few contacts and rooms to which I am connected. You are also given a notice that you need to verify this session.

Since I had been using Matrix on Quaternion, I didn’t think much of getting it all set up, but I was quite wrong. So it appears that I have not had any messages encrypted using Quaternion, it was all out there in the open. Since I wanted to ensure that my session is verified and has encryption enabled, I had to go through the process.

The method that I think is rather unique and easy to accomplish is to use the interactive emoji verification. Since I started with Element on the mobile client, for reasons, I begin the process on the mobile client to verify my Desktop session. To get there, go into your Settings > Security & Privacy > Show All Sessions. There you will see the sessions logged into Matrix.

Selecting the session titled “Element Desktop (Linux)” with the adjacent red shield icon will reveal some options. You are given two options to verify the “Not Verified” session. Manually Verify by Text and Interactively Verify by Emoji. The mobile will give you a spinning circle and ask you to “Please wait…”

On the Desktop Client you get a focus stealing Incoming Verification Request pop up in the application. Which is what you want to be able to have trusted end-to-end encrypted messages. A new dialog will display informing you of the incoming verification request.

Once the two devices have made their handshake, you are asked to confirm the emojis are in the same order on both sessions. Easy to do, hold the mobile up adjacent the monitor and observe that they match. I just happen to find this method to be clever and amusing.

That is it, you now have your desktop and mobile Element clients. This makes your security all green and your sessions trusted.

It would be advisable to set a passphrase or generate a security key for you encryption key. I did this in the mobile application and copied it to my Bitwarden for safe keeping. You can also use a Security Phrase as well. This will just help you should you log into Matrix from another Element client.

My original intent was to go into how to set up bridges to other services, and the like, but I am already bumping up against my self-imposed word limit. So, I am going to separate out and make a kind of series of blatherings about Matrix chat using Element. This is enough to get you going with your mobile and desktop machines having properly setup and trusted clients. Now, it’s time to do some searching for rooms to have conversations. I’ll figure out how to bridge my other things another time and get back to that place of a centralized communication client I once enjoyed about a decade ago.

What I Like

The Element client makes using Matrix quite enjoyable. Previously, using Matrix was a bit of a lack-luster, almost a science experiment kind of feel to it. Sure, it worked but it didn’t have the polish and great user experience I have using Telegram. I can say, with much confidence, using Element feels like a real product. It feels just as good as any other messaging client. It is still early days for me so it’s still all new and exciting.

I have previously talked about in on of my noodlings how it would be nice to consolidate all these different messaging services like the good ol days of MSN, Yahoo and AIM rather than have all these different chat clients scattered about. I don’t use MSN, Yahoo or AIM anymore but I do have several others. I find the breadth of available bridges rather astounding.

What immediately interests me most is SMS and Facebook messenger. Those are both services I loath using. I would consider using IRC as I can see the utility of being able to stay on top of chats going on there and possibly Discord and Telegram but I don’t think it likely that I will be replacing Telegram or Discord anytime soon. openSUSE does have Matrix bridges into the Telegram groups and Discord rooms so no more work needed there. I will be playing around with these.

Most importantly, I appreciate that there is a dark theme so that you aren’t forced to stab you eyes with the painfully bright light hues. This is essentially a minimum requirement for me at this point. If I cannot get a dark theme, I don’t want to use it (Ahem, Hangouts).

What I Don’t Like

Understanding how this whole encryption thing works, and how your credentials are stored on the main Matrix server. I understand that your key is encrypted at your end and stored on the Matrix server but what exactly does that mean, I am not sure. I thought the benefit of Matrix is that it is all decentralized.

It took me a bit of time to get my head wrapped around what Matrix was vs Element. I would hear, “Matrix is the protocol not the client” and I didn’t quite grasp it. I also don’t like it that some clients just don’t work that well. Now that Element is here, I can see it as being the main client to be used, maybe even universally. Parts of the setup of Element / Matrix are a bit dubious but much of that has been cleaned up quite nicely.

Next Steps

Where to, from here. Now that I have a client for Matrix that is pretty darn great, I am going to explore the other possibilities. I see a lot of potential in simplifying my life with communication. I loath using Facebook Messenger and the way I am using SMS has not been ideal. Matrix has the possibility of removing two irritations of mine and I look forward to making this happen. I have decided to break out the bridges to their own discovery experiences and will blather about those in the future.

Final Thoughts

Matrix is now a highly polished, accessible experience for secure communication on the Internet. It is a decentralized system but also has a centralized hub for simplicity of connectivity. It really appears as though they have the little papercuts worked out and have really made available a great system to be used by any.

It’s still early days for this Element Client but things are looking pretty good. I don’t expect I will get friends and family on it anytime soon as it is a bit more work than Telegram but for those other tech enthusiast out there and for simplicity of my communication platforms, this looks like the ticket. The real question is going to be, how reliable this and the bridges are to use long term.

Do I recommend Element as a Matrix chat client? Absolutely. I look forward to its continued use.

References

https://flatpak.org/setup/openSUSE/
https://software.opensuse.org/package/flatpak
https://element.io/
https://matrix.org/bridges/

Wavebox | Chat Unification Snap Application on openSUSE Tumbleweed

Wavebox on openSUSE

From time to time, I like to play around with the universal packaging available in Linux. It has mostly been AppImages and Flatpak but I wanted to Snap something into my system. After working out an AppArmor issue. Snaps were working fantastically well once again. The application I wanted to try was another Chat Message Unification Application. I had heard wonderful things about Wavebox so it was time to try it out. It’s described as, “A clever new home for cloud apps on your desktop bringing Gmail, Inbox, Outlook, O365, Trello, Slack & over 1000 more apps into a configurable client.”

You can look at the details here on the SnapCraft store.

Wavebox Snap 19

In a terminal I installed Wavebox from the Snap Store:

sudo snap install wavebox

Installation was a snap (haha) and it created an entry in the application menu of KDE Plasma, just as one would expect. It should also be noted that the system tray icon also looks great next to the rest of the icons sitting there too.

Wavebox Snap 20 System Tray.png

When the Application started up, I didn’t notice any lengthy start up time that has been complained about in the past with Snaps. It was delightfully… snappy… and when it settled I was greeted with a pleasant interface. There was no question as to what I needed to do, create an account.Wavebox Snap 2

Going through the process was really quite trivial. You begin by entering your name, email and password. I elected to setup two-factor authentication which did require me to install an application on my phone…

After you have logged in, you can add your first application. I went with Slack, specifically the Bad Voltage slack group. There is a convenient search box right at the top of the uncluttered interface.

I am not 100% sure what the “Pic a Colour” section does, entirely but it does create a ring around thee account on the side tab of the service. Setting up Slack was trivial and has the same basic feel of what you would have in the web browser.

What I think is interesting is the different customization features you can specify for each module you add. What is interesting to me is the ability to put a tab to sleep and stop it after some time of inactivity. I don’t know exactly what that means and how it is implemented but if that is what I am thinking it is, that should be more kind to your system when on battery power. I find with all the services running in either a browser or other Chat Unification applications, the CPU usage is noticeable.

Wavebox Snap 11

I wanted to install the G-suite of tools and began that process by selecting the Gmail icon when adding an application. There is a similar “Pick a Colour” selection then you can choose which services it loads into this “tab”. I didn’t test all the functions but the ones that did worked as expected. The Hangouts button doesn’t give me the hangouts configuration I prefer but it is functional, none the less.

Wavebox Snap 13

Setting up the account is much like logging in through a browser or even Kmail, for that matter. When you sign in, you then configure the default inbox configuration.

The display of the email is as you would see in a web page but the added benefit is that you have all the other services on a menu bar at the top of the Window. This is, by far, the best implementation of interfacing with the Google Services I have ever seen. It is far more functional than the Google defaults and even nicer than what I have been using on similar services.

Memory Use

It’s very easy to see how much of your drive is taken up by the application

/dev/loop11 156M 156M 0 100% /snap/wavebox/180

I don’t view this as outrageous at all. The application has another 181 MiB of storage on my home directory in the snap folder. I haven’t fully investigated the the contents of the folder but it does keep historical snap version configuration files, which is interesting.

Running the 10 Google Services, Riot and Slack, I am using about 490 MiB of RAM, so, 12 services in all on this so about 40.8 MiB per service. Combine that with the sleep function, this doesn’t feel too bad.

What I like

The way that Wavebox bundles the Google Services into one tab and how integrated and purposeful it feels makes this application really quite special. There is a lot of thought and detail put into it. I would say that this is a far better “Google Experience” than what you would have on a Chromebook. It is, seemingly a much more efficient and integrated experience, really, the best I have ever seen.

The Sleep Tab feature is very interesting and I have not studied it enough to know exactly how it works because I have received email notifications while the tab was sleeping so it must check periodically. somehow. I would really like to run this on a long term basis and determine, or at least, better determine what it is doing. Maybe even do some CPU usage comparisons between Wavebox and similar services but I just don’t have the time for that.

The conveniences of having all the different communication and collaboration services in one window, everything unified, is very conducive to productivity. That feature alone makes this application stand out from others similar to it. I would determine that it is a better experience than what you have in a browser with a string of pinned tabs.

What I Don’t Like

Wavebox does requires a login to an external server someplace to manage your accounts. This is like the Franz application I have also reviewed. It was an area for which I didn’t particularly like. I do see the utility of it and since these are all services you are logging into, one more isn’t that big of a deal… really… but somehow that is still a sticking point for me.

Wavebox isn’t free. Not that I think everything should be free but I would rather spit out a one time payment for this application. It costs $48 per year to use this application. For my purposes, since my efficiency with any of these services is not a part of my job, (arguably maybe Google could be), it isn’t a good value for me to make the investment. However, if your work required you to communicate on numerous  services regularly, I could absolutely see this as being a vital piece for improved quality of [computing] life.

Final Thoughts

Wavebox LogoRambox and Franz are both similar applications I have reviewed, albeit with a slightly different lens, they are all really quite fantastic applications. Any one is a good choice and I am glad that they all exist. There are features from each application that I appreciate so each application has their merit. I would say that of all of them Wavebox does seem to have just a bit more polish than the rest. There are more tools and tweaks with this and the way all the Google Services are rolled up with a very convenient menu makes this the best experience for using G-Suite. Far better than even with Chrome or using a Chromebook. This is so nicely integrated that it makes a mediocre web application experience feel like a real, nicely polished, and purposeful, native application.

Wavebox is, undoubtedly, suited for the professional user, not so much a dude like me that can’t seem to stick with an application like this for more than 6 months or so. This is extremely well thought out and well executed. Features like the Sleep Tab make this stand above other options.

Another final thought, having access to Snaps (along with other universal packages) available on openSUSE Tumbleweed really opens up a very wide array of available applications for my use. Snaps seem to integrate well into openSUSE; just as long as nothing gets messed up with AppArmor again. Snaps are a great choice for application delivery for many cases and I am thankful that I have access to them.

References

Wavebox from the Snap Store Web Frontend

Snapd Resolved bug on Bugzilla

Rambox | Chat Message Unification Application for openSUSE

Franz | Chat Messaging Unification Application on openSUSE

Rambox | Chat Message Unification Application for openSUSE

Rambox on openSUSE

Not long ago, I started using Franz, a chat messaging unification application and I had a good experience with it. I had talked to a few e-friends about it and some advised me that I should also try Rambox. Since I had just installed Franz, I wasn’t about to try something else, not yet anyway. After some time of very happily using Franz, something had happened and it wouldn’t start. Since I was using a community repository and I could have very well chosen another community repository and kept going but it was time to try this Rambox all the kids have been talking about. So I did.

Installation

Like anything else in openSUSE, the installation is easy, just search and install. Since I did that part, you can just check here:

https://software.opensuse.org/package/rambox

Once the installation is complete. A menu entry will appear under the “Internet” category. Click there or whatever method you see fit.

How It Runs

The application runs well and it is as intuitive as one would expect. The difference that I noticed, as compared to Franz, is that having an account with an external service is optional. Franz requires you to sign into their service in order to use their software and in doing so, synchronizes all your systems that are running Franz. This is quite handy. Rambox too as this option but it is not compulsory.

Rambox-01-Start Screen

Rambox has many built in options for services for you to configure. In fact it has more service options than Franz does, most notably, Mastodon. If there is a particular service you want and it is not available, you have the option to add a custom service. This was particularly handy as Rambox does not have a Google Calendar service.

Rambox has several customization features to it. Notably, there is application behavior for notifications, a hardware acceleration feature and start automatically on system startup.

Rambox-02-Settings.png

The customization feature I do appreciate is the service bar location. I put the bar along the left, as opposed to the top… no speculation on that location necessary.

Adding a service is incredibly straight forward. Select the service you want and fill in all the necessary bits. After you add the new service to the application, it will appear on the service bar.

Rambox-03-Add service

The order of applications can be reordered to your hearts content and services eliminated if they are no longer desired in this application. It is incredibly flexible. In this manner.

Overall, this This application works very well and I intend on using it a bit longer and do some more comparisons to determine if I will continue using it or go back to Franz.

There are cases that a service doesn’t start or restart when network access is lost and reestablished. There is an option to Reload offending service or reload all of Rambox. Under the View menu.

What I Like

When comparing it to Franz, the feature that I appreciate the most is the ability to enter a custom service. In my case, I added the Google Calendar account related to my employer.

Like Franz, this is a fantastic message unification application. that has a lower memory footprint than using a browser. Rambox uses just under 1.8 GiB for 12 services which shakes out to about 150 MiB per service. I still think this is far too much for what they are doing but not being an expert in this area, I couldn’t tell you why.

Having one application that has all my messaging applications consolidated is very handy. It has a nice notification applet that lets you know when you have a new message on any of your services and mute the notifications if necessary. It should be noted, if you mute your notifications, you won’t hear anything within each service, like an inline video.

Lastly, the option to Synchronize your configuration or not is a handy feature. You can push or pull your configuration as you see fit for each machine. I didn’t try pushing two different configurations to see how that might affect each client.

What I Don’t Like

There is a lack of Dark Theme. I would much prefer that service bar have a dark background to fit the rest of my desktop theme but that is a small potatoes item.

The user interface on the application for the settings or adding another service just do not seem to have that nice modern look as you’d see on Plasma. When loading or saving, the application brings up the GTK File Dialog of which I am not particularly fond.

The biggest sore spot for Rambox is that it does not have a spell check. This is the one area where Franz excels. It is also the only area where Rambox falls short. Outside of that, it is a pretty fantastic application.

Final Thoughts

Rambox is a fine application that I enjoy using. It works well and is more convenient than using a web browser. It also seems to use less memory than a browser so that is also a plus. I don’t know or understand the mechanics as to why but even at approximately 150 MiB per application does seem a bit steep for something that just sends text messages.

If Rambox is an application that works well for you consider supporting the project or if it improves your work flow, try out the Rambox Pro. The application may be free but it isn’t free to make.

For the time being, I am going to continue to use Rambox on my primary machine and Franz on another machine just to see how it shakes out over time. If you are running multiple chat clients and don’t want to authenticate with a third party service, Rambox just might be the application for you.

Further Reading

https://software.opensuse.org/package/rambox

Get Rambox Pro

Rambox App on Github