Amiga Fast File System Return to the Linux Kernel

When I say “Return” what I mean is, return to a fully functional state.

I fancy myself a vintage computer enthusiast, although I haven’t done a whole lot with my Amigas as of late, a part of that has been my apprehension in being able to access the data on my old drives. I also realize that ALL my Amigas need to be recapped in order to function correctly. This series of projects will begin in the near future as I have received new pressures to make it so. One Max Staudt authored a patch that was reviewed and committed by David Sterba, a SUSE developer and kernel maintainer that have removed all my excuses.

Max Staudt has noted that “The basic permission bits (protection bits in AmigaOS) have been broken in Linux AFFS. It would only set bits, but never delete them. Also, contrary to the documentation, the Archived bit was not handled.” My guess is, reading and archiving any AFFS drives was not an issue but manipulating the data from Linux was an issue. “Let’s fix this for good, and set the bits such that Linux and classic AmigaOS can coexist in the most peaceful manner,” he added. Torvalds appears to have agreed as Staudt’s code has made it into rc4 of version 5.9 of the Linux kernel. That is slated to be released to the masses in October 2020.

I am excited about the upcoming improved interaction between my current love of Linux and my historic love of Amiga in what I think is a huge kernel improvement. I don’t know how many people it will truly affect but the fact that Linus Torvalds agreed to include it in rc4 means it can’t just be an isolated edge case. As much as I would like to think that Mr. Staudt, Mr. Sterba, and Mr. Trovalds and are doing this just for me, I know that I am not alone in the love for this old technology.

I will be interested in seeing how this works out. I am hoping that I will be able to use the Amiga Fast File systems natively on Linux like any other file system. This should most certainly be fun. I am also happy to see that an Amiga enthusiast, a developer of SUSE and the top-dog of the Linux Kernel made effort to bring a needed enhancement to the Linux Kernel. It makes me wonder, are there other Amiga fans roaming the halls of SUSE? What kind of Amiga Computers does Max Staudt have? Has Linus Torvalds ever run Linux on an Amiga? It sure would be interesting to know!

Final Thoughts

I am super excited to see that Classic Amiga lives on, in part, within the Linux Kernel. This spectacular news is telling me that it is time to revisit with a lot more emphasis all the fun and excitement that the Amiga brought to me. There is much to do on my Amigas, data to archive and capacitors to replace. This David Sterba from SUSE has taken action to make Linux and Amiga interoperability much better and bridges a 25 year technology gap that helps to bring my 1990s platform of choice do the present.

Thank you, Max Staudt, David Sterba and all those involved on the Kernel team, so much, for what I consider to be the best Linux kernel submissions of 2020. This brings to me a smile that crosses from ear-to-ear to my face and now presses me hard to do more with my Amiga computers.

References

AFFS Patch https://lkml.org/lkml/2020/8/27/990
TheRegister.com Article Linux 5.9 rc4
Amiga Fast File System Tag for 5.9
Linux Kernel Mailing List announcement

Noodlings | Hardware is for the Terminal

18 is such an adult number. Perhaps I am truly becoming a grown up podcast here.

18th Noodling of mid-summer musings

18 Episodes… 18 is a fun number. Divisible by 2, 3, 6 and 9. The age you can vote in the United States.

LG 29″ UltraWide | Monitor Upgrade and Configuration on Linux

I have historically made my hardware decisions based on price, generally I get what I can get for as low or as reasonable as possible. Basically, I go for free or near-free and fabri-cobble something together. After seeing some other computer setups, I have really thought that I want to be able to function more effectively and efficiently than I had been. One of the areas that I have been less than happy has been my monitor layout. I have been pushing 3 displays with my Dell Latitude E6440 and for the most part, it has been meeting my needs but there were some work flows that have not been working out so well.

Tmux Terminal Desktop

I can’t say that I ever spent my childhood wishing I had the ultimate terminal desktop but the more I have played on Linux, the more I have spent time in the terminal and I really can’t explain why I find it so charming. Perhaps it is the low memory usage of the applications? The clever modern implementation of certain terminal applications? I can’t really say, but there is something incredibly charming about the terminal.

Turn off Monitor using CLI

This is another gift to future me from present me. I made the mistake of not properly writing this down before so I had to search for the answer. The problem is, sometimes, it seems as though Plasma is not shutting off my external screens consistently. I can’t say why but I have a suspicion that it is due to a specific communication application as I can almost guarantee that it is preventing my screens from turning off. I don’t have definitive proof of this so I am not going to put it in writing.

BDLL Followup

Keyboards and mechanical keyboard talk

openSUSE Corner

Release Team to have retrospective meeting about openSUSE Leap 15.2

Members of the openSUSE community had two retrospective meeting on the release of openSUSE Leap 15.2 after receiving feedback from the recent survey.

Leap 15.2 Install party @ GOLEM – A quick report

Italian Linux users did an openSUSE Leap 15.2 Launch Party, at the local LUG (it’s called GOLEM, it’s in a small town in central Italy), and Dario Faggioli made a quick report.

Tumbleweed Roundup

  • 20200730 Stable 99
    • MozillaFirefox (78.0.2 -> 79.0) Numerous CVEs addressed
    • snapper (0.8.11 -> 0.8.12)
      • Subpackages: libsnapper5 snapper-zypp-plugin
      • fixed error when using mksubvolume to create /tmp (bsc#1174401)
    • yast2 (4.3.17 -> 4.3.19)
  • 20200731 Stable 99
    • ghostscript
    • kernel-source (5.7.9 -> 5.7.11)
      • iwlwifi: Make some Killer Wireless-AC 1550 cards work again (bnc#1012628).
      • dpaa_eth: Fix one possible memleak in dpaa_eth_probe (bnc#1012628).
      • m68k: nommu: register start of the memory with memblock (bnc#1012628).
      • m68k: mm: fix node memblock init (bnc#1012628).
      • clk: qcom: gcc: Add GPU and NPU clocks for SM8150 (bnc#1012628).
      • ALSA USB-audio bug fix, driver improvements for realtek audio
      • Improvements to USB Serial
      • Intel_th added support for Jasper Lake CPU
  • 20200803 Pending Score of a Stable 93
    • aaa_base (84.87+git20200708.f5e90d7 -> 84.87+git20200507.e2243a4)
      • Too many improvements to list but suffice to say, lots of code cleanup and bug fixes
    • adwaita-qt (1.1.1 -> 1.1.4)
    • dnsmasq (2.81 -> 2.82)
    • polkit (0.116 -> 0.117)
      • memory management fixes
      • read-only-root-fs (1.0+git20200121.5ed8d15 -> 1.0+git20200730.1243fd0)
    • As an aside, bluetooth audio is properly working again.
  • 20200804 pending Stable 97
    • iso-codes (4.4 -> 4.5.0)
    • ncurses (6.2.20200613 -> 6.2.20200711)
      • fixed pound sign mapping in acsc
      • additional changes for building with visual Studio C++

Computer History Retrospective

Computer Chronicles – Printers

At this time, printers were divided up in two classes, impact and non-impact. Emerging technology in in laser printers was being developed.

Final Thoughts

Life can be full of surprises, sometimes you can get a curve-ball thrown at you. It might really throw a wrench in your plans and mess up your plans in life.

Don’t put it off, don’t ignore it. Face that challenge head on. Begin immediately on unwinding the bailiwick. I promise you won’t regret that decision.

Noodlings | Designing, Replacing and Configuring

A prime number podcast but not a prime podcast

17th Noodling of technical musings

I’d like to say something interesting about the number 17, it’s a prime number, the last year you are a minor in the United States, perhaps other places… Team 17 was a great video game house in the 90s that made the game Worms, that was cool. Played that quite a lot some years back…

Fusion 360 Architectural Design

Used Fusion 360 on Linux to help me design a major renovation project. I need a new space for my dusty projects, a place to make wood and metal chips and other non-electronics friendly tasks like welding.

MechBoard64 | Replacement Commodore 64 Keyboard

Modern replacement keyboard project for the Commodore 64. Not in production but all the plans to build your own are available.

Zoom Meeting Large UI Elements | Fix

Over-sized UI elements

TUXEDO Pulse 15 | Possible AMD Linux Laptop Upgrade

First New Piece of Hardware that excites me and just may be my next laptop

BDLL Followup

  • Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix is struggling with their process to become an official distribution due to 3rd party packages
  • FerenOS reaches 5 years
  • Community feedback, concerning getting into Network Administrator, get your hands on, buy some cheap used equipment, get the Debian network administrator handbook. Get real equipment seems like the best way to learn.
  • For me, Ocular for reading. For managing ebooks, I use Calibre. Folio was talked about but it looks to Gnome.

openSUSE Corner

openSUSE + LibreOffice Virtual Conference Extends Call for Papers

Organizers of the openSUSE + LibreOffice Virtual Conference are extending the Call for Papers to August 4. Participants can submit talks for the live conference past the original deadline of July 21 for the next two weeks. The conference is scheduled to take place online from Oct. 15. – 17.

The length of the talks that can be submitted are either a 15-minute short talk, a 30-minute normal talk and/or a 60-minute work group session. Organizers believe shortening the talks will keep attendees engaged for the duration of the online conference.

The conference will have technical talks about LibreOffice, openSUSE, open source, cloud, containers and more. Extra time for Questions and Answers after each talk is possible and the talks will be recorded. The conference will schedule frequent breaks for networking and socializing.

The conference will be using a live conferencing platform and will allow presenters with limited bandwidth to play a talk they recorded should they wish not to present a live talk. The presenter will have the possibility to control the video as well as pause, rewind and fast-forward it.

Attendees can customize their own schedule by adding sessions they would like to participate in once the platform is ready. More information about the platform will be available in future news articles.

Organizers have online, live conference sponsorship packages available. Interested parties should contact ddemaio (at) opensuse.org for more information.

Release Team Asks for Feedback on openSUSE Leap “15.2”

The openSUSE release team is would like feedback from users, developers and stakeholders about the release of the of community-developed openSUSE Leap 15.2 through a survey. The survey is available at https://survey.opensuse.org. openSUSE Leap 15.2 was released on July 2. The survey centers on these two questions: what went well and what didn’t go well?

Tumbleweed Roundup

  • 20200728 Pending Stable 99
    • ffmpeg-4
    • sudo (1.9.1 -> 1.9.2)
      Subpackages: sudo-plugin-python
  • 20200727 Pending Stable 99
    • yast2 (4.3.15 -> 4.3.17)
  • 20200726 Pending Stable 99
    • Mesa (20.1.3 -> 20.1.4)
    • Mesa-drivers (20.1.3 -> 20.1.4)
    • fourth bugfix release for the 20.1 branch
    • just a few fixes here and there, nothing major
    • gnome-disk-utility (3.36.1 -> 3.36.3)
    • Fix creating partitions by using special parameter when requesting the maximal partition size.
    • Updated translations.
  • 20200724 Stable 97
    • NetworkManager (1.24.2 -> 1.26.0)
    • flatpak (1.6.4 -> 1.8.1)
    • kernel-firmware (20200702 -> 20200716)
    • pipewire
    • Subpackages: libpipewire-0_3-0 pipewire-modules pipewire-spa-plugins-0_2 pipewire-spa-tools pipewire-tools
  • 20200721 Stable 94
    • MozillaFirefox
    • Add mozilla-libavcodec58_91.patch to link against updated soversion of libavcodec (58.91) with ffmpeg >= 4.3.
      libzypp (17.24.0 -> 17.24.1)
      Fix bsc#1174011 auth=basic ignored in some cases (bsc#1174011)
      Proactively send credentials if the URL specifes ‘?auth=basic’ and a username.
    • ZYPP_MEDIA_CURL_DEBUG: Strip credentials in header log (bsc#1174011)
    • version 17.24.1 (22)
  • 20200720 Stable 95
    • kernel-source (5.7.7 -> 5.7.9) Numerous fixes
      protect ring accesses with READ- and WRITE_ONCE
      KVM: arm64: vgic-v4: Plug race between non-residency and v4.1 doorbell (bnc#1012628).

Computer History Retrospective

Computer Chronicles – Microchip Technology

Value of computers today is enormous and this put that into some of its perspective.

Final Thoughts

It is never good to live in fear. The world is indeed a dangerous place, filled with so many things that reWe are often focused on the negative in the world. The things that are bad or could be improved and often become far too resentful as a consequence. If we spend more time focusing on the miracles that bring us the technology and comforts we get to enjoy day in and day out. I think the world would be a better place

Noodlings | Amiga 1200, openSUSE Leap 15.2 and Documentation

Almost finished this on time…

16th Noodling of things

There are certain numbers, due to my nerdiness, that have importance to me. 16 is one of them. Some people get excited about reaching 10 or 20 or 100, I get excited about base 2 numbers. 8, 16, 32, 64 will be huge! I’ll have to plan something special for number 64.

Amiga 1200 Replacement Case

openSUSE Virtual Installation Party

I decided to have a properly socially distanced virtual installation party with openSUSE Leap 15.2. It was a nice small group of people. I enjoyed this kind of question answer forum. I had a few people on in the BDLL Discord server for live chat and people on YouTube sending messages

Updating openSUSE Documentation on the Wiki

This was sort of an impromptu activity. I wanted to update the documentation that I maintain for openSUSE and decided to do it while on a live stream and make it a chat with virtual friends.

Now on LBRY

Mostly for the reason of having a backup and other options for people to access the content I create

Concern about information being lost in the block-chain. Several videos I have tried to watch stopped playing with errors.

BDLL Followup

Ubuntu Cinnamon Reivew

New Podcast to fill in the gap. Linux User Space Podcast with Rocco, Joe Lamothe, Dan Simmons and Leo Chavez

Thoughts on Apple moving to its own silicon

openSUSE Corner

Computer History Retrospective

Computer Chronicles – Storage Devices (1983)

This is a great retrospective on how far we have come with mass storage devices.
Last part of a computer that was still mechanical

At this time there was rapid development happening on magnetic storage mediums. In a short period of time, the technology packed only a few thousand bits per square inch and quickly moved to 8 million bits per square inch and beyond.

Guest, Alan Shugart from Seagate technology shared that the introduction to the 8″ floppy proved the tech and the 5¼” floppy helped in the explosion of the home computer. Intel’s bubble memory device, a solid state device would not ever replace the floppy. Shugart said nothing will replace the floppy and that he didn’t see the 3.5″ replacing the 5¼” floppy because the world’s programs are all written on 5¼” floppies and he can’t see it ever being trans-coded onto another medium.

Final Thoughts

It is never good to live in fear. The world is indeed a dangerous place, filled with so many things that remind us of our mortality. regardless, you just cannot live in fear. Live every day with hope and optimism. Regardless of the crazy and awful things happening around us, we are still living the best time of human history.

A new Amiga 1200 Case and Keys in 2020

I love my retro tech. Old computers are just great things. I moved to the Amiga after the Commodore 64 in the early 1990s. I stumbled upon this site and now I want to turn to my aging Amiga 1200 and black it out.

https://www.a1200.net/

So, why would I want to do this to my Amiga 1200? Well, my old case is yellowing and so are the keys. The keys and I have never really liked that biscuit and gray look. When I saw the Amiga CDTV with its black keyboard and case, I thought how cool and sleek it looked but I wanted a more traditional computer (at that time) not something that was meant to go on your Hi-Fi stack. Now, today, you can have both the cool black look along with the full fledged Amiga Computer.

What a great time to be an Amiga 1200 owner! Things I only dreamed of, some 25 years ago are now availale today.

Case

There are a lot of colors from which to choose. Many more options than just black but I am not sure why anyone would want any other color than black. The color computers are supposed to be. Regardless of these color variations falling far outside of my preference, they do look pretty cool.

At the time of writing your options are the original white it called “Escom”, black, light grey, grey, pink, light blue, dark blue, orange, rubine red, violet, purple and translucent.

Link to Gallery of Amiga 1200 cases

I would personally go with black or dark grey for the cool factor. Outside of wanting a different color of case, if you were anything like me, your computer was opened up with some kind of frequency and being an uncoordinated young teen, your case may be damaged from insertion and removal of the screws or breaking the plastic clips along the back by opening it up in the non-recommended fashion. These new cases have screw brass inserts in all 6 screw towers. So, unless you ‘Magilla Gorilla’ those fasteners, you are not likely to have issues. Also, it’s all screws that hold the case together, no more clips to break. I understand why Commodore did the clips, screws cost money and also add complexity into the manufacturing. They were always looking to pinch a penny.

_Overview Brass Insert
Brass inserts in screw towers

The bottom trapdoor, instead of being a slab of plastic now offers better cooling with extra vents. The rear trap door (that I never used) has 3 options: The Plain door, like you would have had on your original A1200; a VGA hole for VGA out; and a DVI hole. No HDMI, but I’m good with that. I’m sure that can easily be remedied.

_Overview Rear Trap doors
Rear trap door options

If you don’t have an actual Amiga 1200 motherboard to put in this, that is NOT a problem as this supports more than just the original board. Smartly, you can use a Raspberry Pi, MiST FPGA, Keyrah V2 keyboard adapter, RapidRoad DoubleUSB and Lotharek HxC Floppy emulator. So essentially pair this with an original keyboard or a new mechanical keyboard designed to fix this case and you are off to the races!

Keycaps

Since my keyboard is in good shape, I haven’t ever spilled anything on it or eat Cheetos while playing games as a young teen, I am looking to replace the keycaps. It should also be noted that the new mechanical keyboard isn’t ready for purchase yet. The look of these keys are great. Black and dark grey looks absolutely fantastic. My keyboard has the UK layout so this would fit perfectly.

Final Thoughts

I am pretty excited about having access to new things for old hardware. What an exciting time to be into Retro Hardware. I hope that this is a successful venture. In order to buy a case, you will have to go to one of the partner site.

This is a great time to be a nerd into 1990s or earlier tech. I have explored a lot of the Commodore 64 side of things and I think it’s time to play in the Amiga sphere a bit now.

References

https://www.a1200.net/
Commodore 64 references on CubicleNate.com

The End of Google Plus — Just Another Blathering

Google Plus Grave StoneIt never gained as much popularity as some other social media platforms but I liked Google Plus. It was (is) a social media platform whose users seemed to focus on positive things, projects and so forth. It lacked the kind of cruft that keeps me from spending much time on other social media platforms.

My primary reason for liking Google Plus was that it seemed as though it was used for productive conversation and collaboration. I have enjoyed the positive sharing and discussions on interesting topics from different Google community Groups. I wonder where a few of these Google Communities will find another home such as the “Going Linux Podcast” and some retro tech Communities for the Amiga and Commodore 64.

What I like About Google Plus

I really enjoy the tech content on Google Plus. Two of which being the Going Linux Podcast and Linux in the Hamshack. I am a regular listener to the podcasts and like to participate from time to time. I read pretty much everything posted there. It is active enough to keep me interested but not so active that I can’t keep up.

I like to keep up on the Solus Project from their Google Plus Community Page, though admittedly, it hasn’t been as active as it once was but this has been my preferred method for keeping up to date on how that project has been rolling along.

Commodore-64-Computer-sm.pngGoogle Plus has become a kind of bastion of a lot of the Retro Tech communities too. I follow Commodore and Amiga groups where I have seen some fascinating projects. I have recently learned about some other new hardware initiatives for the Amiga 1200 and 4000 or something rather fun was this Commodore 64 Paper craft that I found on one of the community pages.

Despite the somewhat clunky interface, my main reason for liking Google Plus is that it doesn’t seem to have any of the cruft you see on some other social media sites. It’s just a nice place to visit that just doesn’t have the propensity for polarizing or aggravating conversations. It is a nice place where people happily share their hobbies.

The Problem with Google Plus

I will not pretend like Google Plus was all peaches and cream. The fact is, the layout of Google Plus got a little weird and never recovered. I liked how it looked much better some 4 years ago and I never utilized the circles. I think I understand what the designers were going for but I just didn’t want to invest the time and effort in meta-tagging people and things. I knew where people belonged. I didn’t particularly care for the three column layout, although, not a horrible thing, it was just a bit more challenging to figure out what was new. It took some time to scan through to find specific posts as they would shift around.

Google Plus 3 columns.png

The interface for Google Plus was a bit cumbersome. It took a few extra clicks to get to where I wanted to go but once you got used to this quirkiness, it wasn’t so bad. I would say, it felt like Google kind of gave up on Google Plus about two years ago. They didn’t really continue to invest in it, which I think is unfortunate as it resulted in it became a bit of a social media joke.

Final Thoughts

I don’t have a replacement for Google Plus at this time. I have heard about and just started looking into Diaspora but I don’t have the mental space to figure it out. I also like Mastodon but I don’t have the WordPress auto share tie to use it.

I have enjoyed the pleasant Google Plus communities for years and they will be missed. I hope that they will find another place to land to continue to exist. Knowing that Google Plus only has about 10 months of life left, I am not going to abandon it. I will continue to use it until the bitter end.

Related Links

Diaspora Foundation

Mastodon Federated Social Network

Commodore Amiga Revitalized with New Retro Hardware

Going Linux Podcast Google Plus Community Page

Linux in the Hamshack

WordPress Mastodon Share Plugin

Commodore 64 Paper craft

Solus Project

Amiga Google Plus Community Page

Commodore 64 Google Plus Community Page