Noodlings | BIOS Games Serving the NDI™ Plugin

Another prime number… and no the title doesn’t make sense. It’s just a nonsensical way to string everything together.

19th Noodling on a mid-August night

18 Episodes… 18 is a fun number. Divisible by 2, 3, 6 and 9. The age you can vote in the United States.

Fun facts about chocolate milk can be found here

BIOS Update Dell Latitude E6440 on Linux

My BIOS was 4 years out of date. I thought it was time to update it. I went to the Dell Support page and noticed that they only had *.exe files available. I sighed and was initially frustrated because my initial supposition was that I was going to have to have a working copy of Windows to do the update. 

AntiMicro | Map Keyboard and Mouse Controls to Gamepad on openSUSE

Installed a game called Pokemon Insurgence on Lutris and there was no way to play the game with a gamepad. Rather than try to fight things, set out for an application that would map the keyboard controls to the WiiU Pro Controller that has become my gamepad of choice.

CPU Downgrade

After receiving this message following a BIOS upgrade, I was forced to purchase a lower powered CPU for my AMD Workstation.

OBS NDI™ Plugin on openSUSE

The NDI plugin offers a fairly easy way to send OBS video signal (presumably other applications can take advantage of this too) to another OBS instance on another machine. This can come in handy for numerous reasons such as splitting up workloads between machines by capturing output from one machine, such as gaming computer, to stream with a dedicated unit that interfaces with YouTube.

BDLL Followup

What have you done that would cause you to lose your Linux card

openSUSE Corner

New Prototype Builds Bringing Leap, SLE Closer Will be Available Soon

The release manager for openSUSE Leap, Lubos Kocman, has updated openSUSE’s develop community on efforts to bring the codes of Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise closer together.

Tumbleweed Roundup

  • 20200805 Stable 99
    • MozillaThunderbird (68.10.0 -> 68.11.0)
      • Several CVEs addressed
    • transactional-update (2.22 -> 2.23)
      • Subpackages: transactional-update-zypp-config
      • Version 2.23
      • Add “run” command to be able to execute a single command in a new snapshot
      • Add “–drop-if-no-change” option to discard snapshots if no changes were performed (BETA, required for Salt integration)
      • Removed previous CaaSP Salt support (gh#openSUSE/transactional-update#33)
      • Avoid “file not found” message on systems without /var subvol
  • 20200810 Score of a moderate 84
    • epiphany (3.36.3 -> 3.36.4)
    • gcc10 (10.2.1+git465 -> 10.2.1+git501)
    • gnome-mines (3.36.0 -> 3.36.1)
    • kernel-source (5.7.11 -> 5.8.0)
    • squid
    • zypper-lifecycle-plugin (0.6.1490613702.a925823 -> 0.6.1596796104.87bdab7)

https://review.tumbleweed.boombatower.com/

Computer History Retrospective

Computer Chronicles – Fifth Generation Computers (1984)

The pioneers in the field talk about 5th generation computers capable of Artificial Intelligence and heuristic learning; giving computers context. In 1984, computers were already being used to make knowledge based decisions.

The Computer Chronicles – Fifth Generation Computers (1984)

Final Thoughts

Take some time to have fun. Good, clean wholesome fun. Go for a walk, enjoy the weather on any day that it is possible. Take some time to cherish each moment, whether it is good or bad, find the positive in the situation and make it a point to say “thank you” as often as possible.

OBS NDI™ Plugin on openSUSE

The NDI plugin offers a fairly easy way to send OBS video signal (presumably other applications can take advantage of this too) to another OBS instance on another machine. This can come in handy for numerous reasons such as splitting up workloads between machines by capturing output from one machine, such as gaming computer, to stream with a dedicated unit that interfaces with YouTube. This has advantages in that you can move the machine doing the heavy lifting into another room or across the room as to not hear the fans and so forth. In my case, my primary machine is getting long in the tooth. I prefer the setup I have as far as the screen layout and height of the computer as well as the location. I use my AMD Desktop / server / workstation machine to talk to YouTube or Twitch directly with that OBS instance and record locally in effect freeing up my laptop from quite a bit of the workload.

The Challenge

At the time of writing, there isn’t an RPM available and the instructions out there along with what to expect seems lacking at best, so, I thought I would take what I know and compile it into one easy, step-by-step guide here for openSUSE. Your mileage may vary depending on your distribution.

Installation

For starters, you need to get the software packages from GitHub.

https://github.com/Palakis/obs-ndi/releases

Download the following:

The version numbers may have changed but you should get the “libndi*” and “obs-ndi*” packages

This is a Debian package meant for Debian/Ubuntu so you may be thinking, “how am I supposed to use this?” …and that is a reasonable question. The solution is a tool that is not often talked about. It is also likely not recommended by most people but I am not most people. That tool is called “Alien“.

To install Alien, navigate here and just click on the appropriate experimental package for your version of openSUSE:

https://software.opensuse.org/package/alien

Alternatively, you can use the terminal method, which will very a bit between distributions

Tumbleweed

sudo zypper ar https://download.opensuse.org/repositories/utilities/openSUSE_Factory/ utilties
sudo zypper ref
sudo zypper install alien

Leap 15.2

sudo zypper ar https://download.opensuse.org/repositories/utilities/openSUSE_Leap_15.2/ utilties
sudo zypper ref
sudo zypper install alien

To explain each of the lines that I am expecting you to put in the terminal because you should NEVER just trust some random commands on the internet. First of all, I stand behind this as CubicleNate, and I do my best to not be wrong and I’d like to keep doing these things. You can also reacho ut to me directly using any of these methods.

Once the installation of Alien is complete. You will have to take the two deb packages previously downloaded and convert them.

Using a terminal, navigate to the location of the downloaded packages and run the following

sudo alien -r libndi*.deb  
sudo alien -r obs-ndi*.deb  
sudo zypper in ./libndi*.rpm obs-ndi*.rpm

Now your are ready to set up OBS!

OBS Setup

Using this reference, I made the adjustments to my firewall but it didn’t work. Perhaps I am missing something and I would love to edit this article accordingly but opening up both tcp and udp ports 5960 through 5968 as well as having the mDNS port active did not allow me to utilize the NDI plugin with firewalld active. Either the documentation is out of date, in correct or there is a user error on my part and I couldn’t find the appropriate logs to tell me otherwise. Therefore, I just deactivated the firewall on both the source and destination machines.

sudo systemctl stop firewall

This is the point where you should be sorely disappointed with these instructions but again, I would like to improve this and will gladly listen to any input.

The next step is to open up OBS-Studio (v25 and latter is required) on both machines. On the source machine, go to Tools > NDI™ Output settings

Then set the output preferences. In my case, I had not interest in sending the “Preview Output” only the “Main Output” and label it with the hostname; just in case I might do this with another machine.

On the Destination OBS machine, you have to add the NDI Source. This is just one of the many options you have available as a source.

For the source name, select the drop-down and the appropriate available source. I didn’t mess with any of the other settings so your mileage may vary on this portion of the instructions as well.

And that is it. Your NDI Source is just another input like a webcam or video signal and you are off to the streaming or production races.

Final Thoughts

The whole firewall thing has me a bummed out a bit. I have wrestled around with it far too long but at least I know that lowering my “shields” will allow for transporters to work. Not ideal but I am within my firewalled off house, I just happen to like security in layers.

I want to note that the latency on this is VERY low. I mean incredibly low. I have tested this by playing a game on one machine and using the output on another machine with almost no latency perceived. It is quite the incredible technical miracle and I am quite grateful.

I also want to make the vintage computer tie-in. The NDI plugin is developed by Newtek, the makers of the Video Toaster that was very popular on the “big box” line of Amiga computers from the 1990s. So, in a way, I feel like I have a little bit of that incredible Video Toaster tech on my openSUSE machine.

References

OBS-NDI on GitHub
https://obsproject.com/forum/resources/obs-ndi-newtek-ndi™-integration-into-obs-studio.528/updates
NDI Problem Solving PDF

Noodlings | Hardware is for the Terminal

18 is such an adult number. Perhaps I am truly becoming a grown up podcast here.

18th Noodling of mid-summer musings

18 Episodes… 18 is a fun number. Divisible by 2, 3, 6 and 9. The age you can vote in the United States.

LG 29″ UltraWide | Monitor Upgrade and Configuration on Linux

I have historically made my hardware decisions based on price, generally I get what I can get for as low or as reasonable as possible. Basically, I go for free or near-free and fabri-cobble something together. After seeing some other computer setups, I have really thought that I want to be able to function more effectively and efficiently than I had been. One of the areas that I have been less than happy has been my monitor layout. I have been pushing 3 displays with my Dell Latitude E6440 and for the most part, it has been meeting my needs but there were some work flows that have not been working out so well.

Tmux Terminal Desktop

I can’t say that I ever spent my childhood wishing I had the ultimate terminal desktop but the more I have played on Linux, the more I have spent time in the terminal and I really can’t explain why I find it so charming. Perhaps it is the low memory usage of the applications? The clever modern implementation of certain terminal applications? I can’t really say, but there is something incredibly charming about the terminal.

Turn off Monitor using CLI

This is another gift to future me from present me. I made the mistake of not properly writing this down before so I had to search for the answer. The problem is, sometimes, it seems as though Plasma is not shutting off my external screens consistently. I can’t say why but I have a suspicion that it is due to a specific communication application as I can almost guarantee that it is preventing my screens from turning off. I don’t have definitive proof of this so I am not going to put it in writing.

BDLL Followup

Keyboards and mechanical keyboard talk

openSUSE Corner

Release Team to have retrospective meeting about openSUSE Leap 15.2

Members of the openSUSE community had two retrospective meeting on the release of openSUSE Leap 15.2 after receiving feedback from the recent survey.

Leap 15.2 Install party @ GOLEM – A quick report

Italian Linux users did an openSUSE Leap 15.2 Launch Party, at the local LUG (it’s called GOLEM, it’s in a small town in central Italy), and Dario Faggioli made a quick report.

Tumbleweed Roundup

  • 20200730 Stable 99
    • MozillaFirefox (78.0.2 -> 79.0) Numerous CVEs addressed
    • snapper (0.8.11 -> 0.8.12)
      • Subpackages: libsnapper5 snapper-zypp-plugin
      • fixed error when using mksubvolume to create /tmp (bsc#1174401)
    • yast2 (4.3.17 -> 4.3.19)
  • 20200731 Stable 99
    • ghostscript
    • kernel-source (5.7.9 -> 5.7.11)
      • iwlwifi: Make some Killer Wireless-AC 1550 cards work again (bnc#1012628).
      • dpaa_eth: Fix one possible memleak in dpaa_eth_probe (bnc#1012628).
      • m68k: nommu: register start of the memory with memblock (bnc#1012628).
      • m68k: mm: fix node memblock init (bnc#1012628).
      • clk: qcom: gcc: Add GPU and NPU clocks for SM8150 (bnc#1012628).
      • ALSA USB-audio bug fix, driver improvements for realtek audio
      • Improvements to USB Serial
      • Intel_th added support for Jasper Lake CPU
  • 20200803 Pending Score of a Stable 93
    • aaa_base (84.87+git20200708.f5e90d7 -> 84.87+git20200507.e2243a4)
      • Too many improvements to list but suffice to say, lots of code cleanup and bug fixes
    • adwaita-qt (1.1.1 -> 1.1.4)
    • dnsmasq (2.81 -> 2.82)
    • polkit (0.116 -> 0.117)
      • memory management fixes
      • read-only-root-fs (1.0+git20200121.5ed8d15 -> 1.0+git20200730.1243fd0)
    • As an aside, bluetooth audio is properly working again.
  • 20200804 pending Stable 97
    • iso-codes (4.4 -> 4.5.0)
    • ncurses (6.2.20200613 -> 6.2.20200711)
      • fixed pound sign mapping in acsc
      • additional changes for building with visual Studio C++

Computer History Retrospective

Computer Chronicles – Printers

At this time, printers were divided up in two classes, impact and non-impact. Emerging technology in in laser printers was being developed.

Final Thoughts

Life can be full of surprises, sometimes you can get a curve-ball thrown at you. It might really throw a wrench in your plans and mess up your plans in life.

Don’t put it off, don’t ignore it. Face that challenge head on. Begin immediately on unwinding the bailiwick. I promise you won’t regret that decision.

Turn off Monitor using CLI

This is another gift to future me from present me. I made the mistake of not properly writing this down before so I had to search for the answer. The problem is, sometimes, it seems as though Plasma is not shutting off my external screens consistently. I can’t say why but I have a suspicion that it is due to a specific communication application as I can almost guarantee that it is preventing my screens from turning off. I don’t have definitive proof of this so I am not going to put it in writing.

My intent is to have a shortcut for turning off all my screens instead of just locking them and hoping that the desktop environment will do its job of turning them off. I do want to point out that when I was using Windows, both 7 and 10, I had this problem too so it is absolutely not an issue with Desktop Linux.

It is fun being able to understand how to talk to a Linux machine through the terminal using the CLI (Command Line Interface). The more you know about how to work with it, the more you will ultimately enjoy your journey in Linux. Here is my solution.

The Commands

The commands I found out there in the vastness of the world wide web lead me to this that I have tested on multiple machines. Two were running Tumbleweed with Plasma and the other Leap 15.2 with Plasma.

xset -display :0 dpms force off

The other command is to force the screen on. This is useful as I have had issues where after undocking my machine, my screen would forget to turn on. I can’t say the reason why but this could also use a Global Shortcut

xset -display :0 dpms force on

The Script

I created a little shell script for turning off my screen called screenoff.sh. I can’t say for sure how all distributions handle this but I have a bin directory in my home folder, so this is where I have chosen to place this script. ~/bin

Using nano, I created a bash script for this.

nano ~/bin/screenoff.sh

Then filled it in with this information

#!/bin/bash

sleep 1
xset -display :0 dpms force off

The purpose of the sleep 1 line is to give me a chance to get my hand away form the keyboard and mouse so I don’t inadvertently cause the desktop environment to wake the screen.

Next I made the file executable. There are many ways to do it but since we are playing in the terminal:

chmod +x ~/bin/screenoff.sh

To test this out, using krunner or open a terminal and type screenoff.sh should turn off your screen. If not, something is wrong and maybe we can figure it out…

Custom Shortcut

It is not real practical to open up krunner or a terminal just to shut off the screen when I have the power to create a custom shortcut in Plasma. Here is how to do it. First open up System Settings and choose the shortcuts module. Your system settings may look a bit different but I am sure you can figure it out. I have faith in you.

Next you have to select the “Custom Shortcuts” submodule.

At the bottom of the list there is an Edit button with a down arrow. Select that > New > Global Shortcut > Command/URL

Name it whatever makes sense for you. I chose the name “Screen Off” to make it pretty clear. Set your shortcut. I chose Meta+Alt+O.

Next, Select the Action tab and enter the path of the script you just created. In my case, it is:
~/bin/screenoff.sh

Select Apply and test it out!

Final Thoughts

Plasma is real easy to customize to your liking. I am very happy with this small modification to make my desktop experience a bit more suited to my personal taste. I don’t expect that this is a very common use case but since I know I am an edge case in much of what I do, this helps me to remember and hopefully there will be at least one person that can use or adapt this to their own case.

I am not a terminal expert so if there is any way that this can be improved, please contact me or comment below

References

Terminal Applications
https://askubuntu.com/questions/62858/turn-off-monitor-using-command-line
https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/16815/what-does-display-0-0-actually-mean

Noodlings | Designing, Replacing and Configuring

A prime number podcast but not a prime podcast

17th Noodling of technical musings

I’d like to say something interesting about the number 17, it’s a prime number, the last year you are a minor in the United States, perhaps other places… Team 17 was a great video game house in the 90s that made the game Worms, that was cool. Played that quite a lot some years back…

Fusion 360 Architectural Design

Used Fusion 360 on Linux to help me design a major renovation project. I need a new space for my dusty projects, a place to make wood and metal chips and other non-electronics friendly tasks like welding.

MechBoard64 | Replacement Commodore 64 Keyboard

Modern replacement keyboard project for the Commodore 64. Not in production but all the plans to build your own are available.

Zoom Meeting Large UI Elements | Fix

Over-sized UI elements

TUXEDO Pulse 15 | Possible AMD Linux Laptop Upgrade

First New Piece of Hardware that excites me and just may be my next laptop

BDLL Followup

  • Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix is struggling with their process to become an official distribution due to 3rd party packages
  • FerenOS reaches 5 years
  • Community feedback, concerning getting into Network Administrator, get your hands on, buy some cheap used equipment, get the Debian network administrator handbook. Get real equipment seems like the best way to learn.
  • For me, Ocular for reading. For managing ebooks, I use Calibre. Folio was talked about but it looks to Gnome.

openSUSE Corner

openSUSE + LibreOffice Virtual Conference Extends Call for Papers

Organizers of the openSUSE + LibreOffice Virtual Conference are extending the Call for Papers to August 4. Participants can submit talks for the live conference past the original deadline of July 21 for the next two weeks. The conference is scheduled to take place online from Oct. 15. – 17.

The length of the talks that can be submitted are either a 15-minute short talk, a 30-minute normal talk and/or a 60-minute work group session. Organizers believe shortening the talks will keep attendees engaged for the duration of the online conference.

The conference will have technical talks about LibreOffice, openSUSE, open source, cloud, containers and more. Extra time for Questions and Answers after each talk is possible and the talks will be recorded. The conference will schedule frequent breaks for networking and socializing.

The conference will be using a live conferencing platform and will allow presenters with limited bandwidth to play a talk they recorded should they wish not to present a live talk. The presenter will have the possibility to control the video as well as pause, rewind and fast-forward it.

Attendees can customize their own schedule by adding sessions they would like to participate in once the platform is ready. More information about the platform will be available in future news articles.

Organizers have online, live conference sponsorship packages available. Interested parties should contact ddemaio (at) opensuse.org for more information.

Release Team Asks for Feedback on openSUSE Leap “15.2”

The openSUSE release team is would like feedback from users, developers and stakeholders about the release of the of community-developed openSUSE Leap 15.2 through a survey. The survey is available at https://survey.opensuse.org. openSUSE Leap 15.2 was released on July 2. The survey centers on these two questions: what went well and what didn’t go well?

Tumbleweed Roundup

  • 20200728 Pending Stable 99
    • ffmpeg-4
    • sudo (1.9.1 -> 1.9.2)
      Subpackages: sudo-plugin-python
  • 20200727 Pending Stable 99
    • yast2 (4.3.15 -> 4.3.17)
  • 20200726 Pending Stable 99
    • Mesa (20.1.3 -> 20.1.4)
    • Mesa-drivers (20.1.3 -> 20.1.4)
    • fourth bugfix release for the 20.1 branch
    • just a few fixes here and there, nothing major
    • gnome-disk-utility (3.36.1 -> 3.36.3)
    • Fix creating partitions by using special parameter when requesting the maximal partition size.
    • Updated translations.
  • 20200724 Stable 97
    • NetworkManager (1.24.2 -> 1.26.0)
    • flatpak (1.6.4 -> 1.8.1)
    • kernel-firmware (20200702 -> 20200716)
    • pipewire
    • Subpackages: libpipewire-0_3-0 pipewire-modules pipewire-spa-plugins-0_2 pipewire-spa-tools pipewire-tools
  • 20200721 Stable 94
    • MozillaFirefox
    • Add mozilla-libavcodec58_91.patch to link against updated soversion of libavcodec (58.91) with ffmpeg >= 4.3.
      libzypp (17.24.0 -> 17.24.1)
      Fix bsc#1174011 auth=basic ignored in some cases (bsc#1174011)
      Proactively send credentials if the URL specifes ‘?auth=basic’ and a username.
    • ZYPP_MEDIA_CURL_DEBUG: Strip credentials in header log (bsc#1174011)
    • version 17.24.1 (22)
  • 20200720 Stable 95
    • kernel-source (5.7.7 -> 5.7.9) Numerous fixes
      protect ring accesses with READ- and WRITE_ONCE
      KVM: arm64: vgic-v4: Plug race between non-residency and v4.1 doorbell (bnc#1012628).

Computer History Retrospective

Computer Chronicles – Microchip Technology

Value of computers today is enormous and this put that into some of its perspective.

Final Thoughts

It is never good to live in fear. The world is indeed a dangerous place, filled with so many things that reWe are often focused on the negative in the world. The things that are bad or could be improved and often become far too resentful as a consequence. If we spend more time focusing on the miracles that bring us the technology and comforts we get to enjoy day in and day out. I think the world would be a better place

Updating Documentation for openSUSE Leap 15.2

After having a Virtual Live Installation Party on YouTube yesterday (02 Jul 2020). I realized, I have to test and update documentation out there on my site as well as the openSUSE Wiki. This is one of those things that I do as I have time, generally. Essentially, this is what I have done for the last several years, not 100% consistently but generally speaking, I keep on top of it. In order to stay organized, I have a “personal” wiki page that I keep track of what it is that I maintain.

I have been told that wikis are not the best form of storing such information. My attitude is, until openSUSE presents a better method, I will continue down the path of using the wiki. Maybe it is not the best repository of information but it is better than nothing. So, until that point, I will continue to use it

Why?

Documentation in the Linux and open source world is very important. In order for us to grow and develop our technical skills, we have to share understanding. I am continually learning and the more I learn the more I become painfully aware of my own ignorance. The only solution that I could find as an antidote to my ignorance was to write down and share my limited knowledge.

The Commission

If you are using a “free” operating system, it isn’t free. It has taken work and love to make it possible for you to use it. People are making personal sacrifices, often without pay, to bring this wonderful tool for you to use. Find a way to contribute back, in whatever way is within your abilities and pay the good will forward.

Final Thoughts

I openly admit my almost unhealthy obsession for the openSUSE project, it is in my obsession that I feel compelled to contribute where ever I can. I am forever thankful for everyone that takes the time to make openSUSE, Linux and all the software that I use possible. The freedom and ability to use my computer that suits my requirements best is something for which I am continually grateful.

References

openSUSE Wiki User Page
YouTube Documentation Update Live Stream
YouTube Virtual Installation Party of openSUSE Leap 15.2

Noodlings | Amiga 1200, openSUSE Leap 15.2 and Documentation

Almost finished this on time…

16th Noodling of things

There are certain numbers, due to my nerdiness, that have importance to me. 16 is one of them. Some people get excited about reaching 10 or 20 or 100, I get excited about base 2 numbers. 8, 16, 32, 64 will be huge! I’ll have to plan something special for number 64.

Amiga 1200 Replacement Case

openSUSE Virtual Installation Party

I decided to have a properly socially distanced virtual installation party with openSUSE Leap 15.2. It was a nice small group of people. I enjoyed this kind of question answer forum. I had a few people on in the BDLL Discord server for live chat and people on YouTube sending messages

Updating openSUSE Documentation on the Wiki

This was sort of an impromptu activity. I wanted to update the documentation that I maintain for openSUSE and decided to do it while on a live stream and make it a chat with virtual friends.

Now on LBRY

Mostly for the reason of having a backup and other options for people to access the content I create

Concern about information being lost in the block-chain. Several videos I have tried to watch stopped playing with errors.

BDLL Followup

Ubuntu Cinnamon Reivew

New Podcast to fill in the gap. Linux User Space Podcast with Rocco, Joe Lamothe, Dan Simmons and Leo Chavez

Thoughts on Apple moving to its own silicon

openSUSE Corner

Computer History Retrospective

Computer Chronicles – Storage Devices (1983)

This is a great retrospective on how far we have come with mass storage devices.
Last part of a computer that was still mechanical

At this time there was rapid development happening on magnetic storage mediums. In a short period of time, the technology packed only a few thousand bits per square inch and quickly moved to 8 million bits per square inch and beyond.

Guest, Alan Shugart from Seagate technology shared that the introduction to the 8″ floppy proved the tech and the 5¼” floppy helped in the explosion of the home computer. Intel’s bubble memory device, a solid state device would not ever replace the floppy. Shugart said nothing will replace the floppy and that he didn’t see the 3.5″ replacing the 5¼” floppy because the world’s programs are all written on 5¼” floppies and he can’t see it ever being trans-coded onto another medium.

Final Thoughts

It is never good to live in fear. The world is indeed a dangerous place, filled with so many things that remind us of our mortality. regardless, you just cannot live in fear. Live every day with hope and optimism. Regardless of the crazy and awful things happening around us, we are still living the best time of human history.

Noodlings | KDE Plasma 5.19, Partition Manager and a BADaptor

Really kicking it in to 3rd gear… not high gear yet.

15th Noodling of nonsense

KDE Plasma 5.19 Experience

It is another fantastic release with much attention being made to the finer details that enhance the usability experience without taking away from any of its functionality.

KDE Partition Manager

I have become quite the fan of Gparted over the years of my Linux life and I started wondering if there were other partition management options out there. Specifically one that is Qt based instead. This is not a light on GTK based applications, I just find that they don’t tend to look as nice and clean as Qt apps. In this off-hand search, I stumbled upon PartitionManger which is in official openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap Repositories.

openSUSE Tumbleweed on an HP Zbook 15 G2 with Nvidia Quadro K2100M

I have reached the end of the road with this machine. We have been together for about three years and before sending it off to the ether, I wanted to try out openSUSE Tumbleweed on it. It was something of a question I have been asking myself since I was first assigned the piece of hardware. Windows 7 worked fine on it but how would it spin with the Plasma desktop.

Badaptor, DeWalt 20v MAX battery to Ryobi 18v One+

In 2019, I bought into DeWalt 20v MAX cordless tool platform as part of my mission to reduce complexity in and improve efficiency in as many aspects of my life as possible. This is a long term mission of mine with many facets but basic tools was at the foundation of this plan. DeWalt has a great line of tools to choose from, but they are aimed at the commercial, industrial or professional builder. I would consider myself an intermediate or advanced DIY-er with the occasional moonlighting as either a handyman or builder, so I wanted some of those higher end tools to be available.

BDLL Follow Up

UbuntuDDE Discussion

UbuntuDDE Review from an openSUSE User on CubicleNate.com

openSUSE Corner

  • Leap 15.2 upcoming release in only 7 days. One week from today
  • openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference Updates
    • https://news.opensuse.org/2020/06/17/opensuse-libreoffice-conference-update/
    • Organizers of the openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference have been slightly adjusted the conference dates from the original dates of Oct. 13 – 16 to the new dates of Oct. 15. – 17.
    • The new dates are a Thursday through a Saturday. Participants can submit talks for the live conference until July 21 when the Call for Papers is expected to close.
    • The length of the talks for the conference have also been changed. There will be a 15-minute short talk, a 30-minute normal talk and a 60-minute work group sessions to select. Organizers felt that shortening the talks were necessary to keep attendees engaged during the online conference. The change will also help with the scheduling of breaks, social video sessions and extra segments for Questions and Answers after each talk.

Tumbleweed

https://review.tumbleweed.boombatower.com/

  • 20200611 Stable 98
    • Alsa 1.2.2 -> 1.2.3
    • ffmpeg-4 4.2.2 -> 4.2.3 – Stable bug fix release, mainly codecs and format fixes
    • ncurses 6.2.20200502 -> 6.2.20200531
    • yast2 4.3.5 -> 4.3.6
    • 20200612 Moderate 72
    • iwlwifi broken in kernel-5.7.1
    • NVIDIA kernel module broken release
  • 20200614 Unstable 66
    • zypper dup from 20200609 to 20200614 and run into an infinite boot loop: https://paste.opensuse.org/89998412
      Hardware: Processors: 12 × Intel® Core™ i7-9750H CPU @ 2.60GHz Memory: 15,4 GiB Arbeitsspeicher Graphics Processor: Mesa DRI Intel® UHD Graphics 630
    • This was probably due to the move to GCC10
  • 20200615 Moderate 71
    • Fix building with gcc10
  • 20200616 Moderate 73
    • plasma-framework 5.70.0 -> 5.71.0
  • 20200617 Moderate 74
    • zypper (1.14.36 -> 1.14.37)
    • Mesa (20.0.7 -> 20.1.1)
  • 20200618 Pending moderate 74
    • PackageKit
    • flatpak
    • plasma5-thunderbolt
  • 20200621 Pending moderate 79
    • plasma5-workspace (5.19.0 -> 5.19.1)
    • snapper (0.8.9 -> 0.8.10)
  • 20200622 Pending moderate 78
    • gnome-desktop (3.36.2 -> 3.36.3.1)
    • libreoffice (6.4.4.2 -> 7.0.0.0.beta2)

Computer History Retrospective

Computer Chronicles – Computers in Education (1983)

Fear of computers replacing teachers and dehumanizing education
– I think in many ways this has happened but in a way, with the changes in multimedia, as opposed to the beeps and boops of computers in 1983, we have humanized computers a bit. With individuals creating tutorials and education personalities you can follow online have made more educators out of us as opposed to less
– Terminal becomes a kind of personal tutor
– Time at the terminal is more like a game
– Computer instruction was more like rote training
– Kids trained in logic
– Logo whimsical way to tell a computer what to do taught

Final Thoughts

If you are going to spread anything, make it love, joy and peace. You can’t ever go wrong with that

KDE Partition Manager on openSUSE

I have become quite the fan of Gparted over the years of my Linux life and I started wondering if there were other partition management options out there. Specifically one that is Qt based instead. This is not a light on GTK based applications, I just find that they don’t tend to look as nice and clean as Qt apps. In this off-hand search, I stumbled upon PartitionManger which is in official openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap Repositories.

I should note, they both Gparted and KDE Partition Manager use the same icon.

Installation

Since this isn’t installed by default with the Plasma Desktop, arguably it should be, here is how you o about it. I noticed on the openSUSE Software Site, its short description is that you can Easily manage disks, partitions and file systems on your KDE Desktop. So I guess we will see if this holds true.

It is also described as being software that allows you to manage your disks, partitions and file systems that allows you to create, resize, delete, copy, backup and restore partitions with a large number of supported file systems. These file systems include ext2 ext3, reiserfs, NTFS, FAT32 and more. I am guessing you can also do Ext4, BTRFS and others.

It goes on to say that it makes use of external programs to get its job done, so you might have to install additional software (preferably packages from your distribution) to make use of all features and get full support for all file systems.

That’s good news as I am hoping it wouldn’t re-implement anything and just use existing tools.

To install in terminal:

sudo zypper install partitionmanager

or navigate here for the Direct Install Link

https://software.opensuse.org/package/partitionmanager

As expected, it installed very little, a total of 4 new packages:

  • kpmcore – KDE Partition Manager core library
  • libkpmcore7 – KDE Partition Manager core library
  • partitionmanager – Main Application package
  • partitionmanager-lang – Language support

Considering I have Gparted already installed, most of everything else is likely already there. I have a great respect and love for Gparted at this point, I am hoping that I am not losing any features by using KDE Partition Manager.

First Run and Impressions

Using the handy Plasma menu with the search feature, I started typing “Partition” and it popped up. I launched it and was given the dialog for root user permissions.

I am on the fence if I like that very detailed command being being shown by default. Instinctively, I say it is fantastic, but for a less experienced user, it could feel a bit overwhelming, perhaps.

After the root login requirement, I had this warning pop up which I thought was fantastic!

I have been using Gparted for quite some time and was having issues with an SD Card. My laziness, I just ignored it and now I see what the problem was. I needed the exfat utilities and now the world is right again. Adding this was as easy as running this in the terminal:

sudo zypper install exfat-utils

This automatically selected fuse-exfat package to be installed as well.

Once all this was up. I was greeted with a nice clean and familiar interface

What sets this apart from Gparted is that it shows you all the devices in a side pane instead of the drop-down. I will say, I much prefer the side pane to the drop down. It gives a better overview of what you are doing.

Gparted with the drop-down to select the device

I wanted to format a device and give it a label for my upcoming experimentation with Ventoy for keeping and testing Linux distribution ISOs. So that is what I did.

Mainly, I just wanted the appropriate label. I also took this as an opportunity to format that SD Card, also an easy success.

Final Thoughts

It works! I can’t say it’s any better than Gparted as they both seem to work the same and have a similar appearance and workflow. If you can use one, you can use the other. The biggest difference is the devices side menu. I do like that more than the Gparted drop down. It provides a better snapshot of the status of the storage devices on your machine. Outside of that. KDE PartitionManager as well as Gparted are fantastic tools and this is mostly an appearance preference as I am sure they are using all the same backend of tools.

References

https://software.opensuse.org/package/partitionmanager
https://www.kde.org/applications/system/kdepartitionmanager
USB or Removable Media Formatting in Linux on CubicleNate.com

KDE Plasma 5.19 on openSUSE Tumbleweed

It was not so long ago that Plasma 5.18 graced my computer and very excitingly, 5.19 is here now. Since Tumbleweed is my main Linux system I use, I decided to share my experience on openSUSE Tumbleweed but it should be noted that you can enjoy Plasma 5.19 on Leap as well using the backports repositories. Leap is not my preferred method but it is an option.

Bottom Line Up Front: It is another fantastic release with much attention being made to the finer details that enhance the usability experience without taking away from any of its functionality.

This release of Plasma is being called the “more polished Plasma” and I think this is absolutely correct. The transition for me has been quite delightful. New little bits of happiness have been sprinkled about my desktop experience. There is nothing particularly earth shattering going on here. Just continued refinements.

The Little Things

I will be the first to call me out and remind anyone that I would totally poo-poo on making a big deal about the little touches of a desktop environment. I will hold fast on my belief that function over form but when you can add some form to function, you really hit the sweet spot with me.

For starters, what really stands out is the Bluetooth connections applet that shows the status of a connection. It is just a small thing, a status icon on the disconnected devices.

Discover is becoming my favorite software center now. It has been working quite nicely. The only thing it is missing on openSUSE is access to the Snap store. It has been handling updates quite nicely as well as anything with Flatpak. I do have a propensity to use the terminal because I love the terminal but Discover is really eating into that a bit.

It’s easy to use, responsive and has been working very well for me when installing new applications. This is not the Discover of 2 years ago and if you haven’t used it in a while, now may be a good time.

The neatest feature that I think is noteworthy is how system settings are presented to you know when you call them up. For example: in Plasma past, when you opened the display settings using krunner or in the application menu, it opened up that specific module only. Now, calling the Display Settings, will open up the module but in the context of the system settings menu so you can Select < All Settings arrow back to all your settings and continue on with your modification of things as you may see fit.

This is just a little thing but it is a great little thing and quite welcome.

The Media Player applet looks a lot nicer now. Before it was fine but now it has a more appealing layout and you can adjust the volume of what is being played back right there, which is very nice.

There was some talk about improving the spacing to give a more consistent look but it must be so subtle to me that I am just not picking up on the differences there. I will say that the notifications are is far better now than it was a year or so ago where it would become an almost epileptic mess of dialog boxes and rendering other applets non-functional until Plasma was done telling you what it insisted upon telling you.

What I Like

All theses little tweaks and user experience enhancements certainly plays into the idea that this is mostly a “Polished Plasma” release. I would say, that these incremental enhancements are very welcome and further underscore why I enjoy using Plasma, day in and day out. It is as though the developers have my interests at heart when they do their fantastic work.

The Memory information is nothing new but I really enjoy just looking at it sometimes. I often wonder, what exactly is going on right now that the memory is fluctuating like it does. Regardless, it is just a fun informational display that really appeals to my nerdiness.

What I don’t like

Due to the nature of rolling distributions and enhancements, I do have a lot of updates in a week or if I wait, a couple of weeks. Because of this, I am often eagerly looking for updates to see what has rolled down. This means, when new things are coming, like Plasma, I am going around and updating everything excitedly to see the new shiny. Not is not a bad thing about openSUSE or Plasma but rather a problem with me as I have a hard time waiting to the end of the work day or weekend to see what great newness I get to play with. It has also made me very spoiled and when I do, on the rare occasion, have an issue I can forget how good I have it.

Final Thoughts

I would most certainly call this a “Polished Plasma” release and I am very content with it. I look forward to further releases like this. They make the time spent on my computer just a bit more enjoyable. Not just with new features but all the different usability and customization tweaks to which they give me such easy access. I hope they continue down this fantastic path for years to come.

References

KDE Repositories for openSUSE Leap
KDE Plasma 5.19.0 release notes
openSUSE Tumbleweed Download
Plasma 5.18 Release for openSUSE Tumbleweed on CubicleNate.com